June 21, 2007

Dr. Terry Collins, Thomas Lord Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Institute for Green Oxidation Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, 6-21-07


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Terrence J. Collins, Ph.D., the Thomas Lord Professor of Chemistry at the Mellon College of Science, Carnegie Mellon University, is distinguished by his seminal scientific contributions to green chemistry and his dedication to green chemistry education. He is recognized world-wide as an energetic public advocate for greater use of green chemistry to help achieve a sustainable civilization. In 1997 his work won the award of the Society of Pure and Applied Coordination Chemistry (Japan) and in 1999 the U.S. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award from the Environmental Protection Agency.

After completing postdoctoral work at Stanford University, Dr. Collins taught at the California Institute of Technology before coming to Carnegie Mellon in 1987. At Carnegie Mellon, Dr. Collins is the Director of the Institute for Green Oxidation Chemistry, which was established in 2000. Previously, he was an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar.

The Institute for Green Oxidation Chemistry maintains active research collaborations with academic researchers and industrial colleagues throughout the world. It is also has a strong and expanding educational component. Dr. Collins envisions growth of the Institute geared toward teaching our next generation of scientists and engineers ethics and sustainability studies across multiple disciplines.

One of the leading educators in the field of green chemistry, Dr. Collins published the first definition of green chemistry in 1997 for the Macmillan Encyclopedia of Chemistry, Volume 2. He was invited to contribute extensive on-line materials on sustainability science to the American Chemical Society (ACS) Green Chemistry Institute, and served as a consultant for “Reactions in Chemistry,” a professional development series for high school teachers developed by Annenberg Media.

Dr. Collins represented the U.S. at the Workshop on the Funding of Sustainable Chemistry, which took place in Tokyo in 2000 as part of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. An author or co-author of more than 100 publications in the scientific literature, Collins has served as an American associate editor of the Royal Society of Chemistry journal, Green Chemistry, as well as a member of the editorial advisory boards of Chemical and Engineering News and Environmental Chemistry. He also is a co-chair of the Annual Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference and a consultant for the prestigious annual Green Chemistry Gordon Conference.

Posted by David Lemberg at 08:21 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

June 14, 2007

Dr. Raj Manglik, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Thermal Fluids and Thermal Processing Laboratory, University of Cincinnati, 6-14-07


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Dr. Raj Manglik is Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Thermal Fluids and Thermal Processing Laboratory at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Manglik received his Ph.D. in 1991 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York.

He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Wessex Institute of Great Britain. He has also received the National Science Foundation Young Investigator/CAREER Award, the Procter & Gamble UERP Award (1995), and the National Science Foundation Research Initiation Award (1992).

Dr. Manglik is or has been the editor of the Journal of Heat Transfer (ASME), International Journal of Heat Exchangers, and Heat Transfer & Fluid Flow Data Books.

Dr. Manglik reports on activities related to Fuel Cells —

"The imperatives of growing energy demands urgently warrant the development of alternative energy systems, and Fuel Cells have become increasingly attractive as they can readily operate with hydrogen and organic hydrocarbon fuels. Our research addresses DMFC for portable electronic devices, PEMFC for automobile and transportation, and SOFC for cogeneration and large power generation. System optimization is considered for viable usage and enhancement of energy efficiency and power density. Primary determinants for both performance optimization and economic miniaturization are the attendant thermal and water management to control and enhance the heat, mass, and volatile species transport."

Posted by David Lemberg at 08:16 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

May 24, 2007

Dr. Thomas Tomich, WK Kellogg Chair in Sustainable Food Systems and Director, Agricultural Sustainability Institute, UC Davis; and Director, University of California ANR Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program, 5-24-07


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Dr. Thomas P. Tomich joined the University of California Davis faculty in January 2007. He is founding director of the new Agricultural Sustainability Institute, inaugural holder of the WK Kellogg Chair in Sustainable Food Systems, and Professor of Community Development, Environmental Science and Policy at UC Davis. He also serves as Director of the UC ANR statewide Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program.

Dr. Tomich was principal economist for the World Agroforestry Centre from 1994-2006. During that time, he worked with the ASB Partnership for the Tropical Forest Margins, first in Southeast Asia and then as ASB global coordinator, based in Nairobi, Kenya, leading long-term collaborative partnerships at sites in the Amazon, Congo Basin, and Southeast Asia aiming to raise productivity and income of rural households without increasing deforestation or undermining essential environmental services.

Previously, Dr. Tomich spent 10 years as a policy advisor and institute associate with the Harvard Institute for International Development and also served as a lecturer in economics and in public policy at Harvard University. He received his B.A. in economics from UC Davis in 1979 and has an M.A. and Ph.D. in Food Research from Stanford University.

As part of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, the UC Davis Agricultural Sustainability Institute provides leadership for research, teaching and outreach and extension efforts in agricultural sustainability at the Davis Campus and throughout the University of California system. Current activities include recruitment for eight faculty positions affiliated with the Institute, development of undergraduate and graduate curricula related to agricultural sustainability, and strategic planning for the institute to guide future initiatives and fundraising for research and outreach activities in agricultural sustainability.

Posted by David Lemberg at 08:42 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

May 03, 2007

Dr. J. Robert Beyster, Founder, Science Applications International Corporation, 5-3-07


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Dr. Robert Beyster was Chairman of the Board of SAIC until his retirement in July 2004. SAIC is the largest employee-owned research and engineering company in the United States, with annual revenues of $8 billion and more than 43,000 employees.

A recognized authority on national security and reactor physics, Dr. Beyster has committed the past 35 years to building SAIC on the founding tenets of employee ownership and technical excellence. In recent years, he has extended this commitment to the American business community by founding a nonprofit organization, Foundation for Enterprise Development, to assist organizations considering employee ownership.

Dr. Beyster is the author of the recently published, The SAIC Solution: How We Built an $8 Billion Employee-Owned Technology Company. He has written or co-authored approximately 60 publications and reports. Dr. Beyster is a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and a member of the Scientific Advisory Group to the Director, Strategic Target Planning Staff of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Posted by David Lemberg at 08:16 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

Dr. Peter Myers, Founder and CEO, Environmental Health Sciences, 5-3-07


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Environmental Health Sciences is an organization engaged in advancing public understanding of environmental links to health. EHS publishes Environmental Health News, which provides a resource for the most up-to-date science journal articles and reports on environmental health issues.

From 1990 through the end of 2001, Dr. Peter Myers served as Director of the W. Alton Jones Foundation. He is co-author of Our Stolen Future, a book that explores the scientific basis of concern for how contamination threatens fetal development. Currently, Dr. Myers is Board Chair of the National Environmental Trust and the Science Communication Network. He is also on the boards of the Environmental Grantmakers Association and the Jenifer Altman Foundation.

Posted by David Lemberg at 08:14 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

Dr. Jody Roberts, 2006-07 Gordon Cain Fellow in Technology, Policy, and Entrepreneurship, Chemical Heritage Foundation, 5-3-07


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The Chemical Heritage Foundation, located in Philadelphia, maintains a world-class collection of materials that document the history and heritage of the chemical and molecular sciences, technologies, and industries. CHF programs advance an understanding of the role of the chemical and molecular sciences, technologies, and industries in shaping society.

Dr. Jody Roberts' interests focus on the intersections of the chemical sciences, environmentalism, and public health, with specific attention to chemical practices and technologies. More specifically, he has done research on the green chemistry movement and the fields of human biomonitoring and endocrine disrupting chemicals.

Posted by David Lemberg at 08:11 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

April 12, 2007

John Rennie, Editor in Chief, SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 4-12-07


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John Rennie is only the seventh editor in chief in the 160-year history of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN magazine. Since his appointment in late 1994, he has been the executive force behind the modernization and reinvigoration of this great publishing institution.

Rennie joined the staff of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN as a member of the Board of Editors in 1989, having previously worked as a science writer covering biology, technology, and medicine for a variety of publications. He helped plan and edit several of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN’s distinguished single-topic issues, including Mind and Brain (Sept. 1992, the best-selling issue in SA’s history) and Life, Death and the Immune System (Sept. 1993, later republished as a book by W.H. Freeman).

As Editor in Chief, Rennie oversaw such single-topic issues as Key Technologies for the 21st Century (Sept. 1995), What You Need to Know About Cancer (Sept. 1996) and A Matter of Time (Sept. 2002) All three of these issues were nominated for National Magazine Awards; What You Need to Know About Cancer and A Matter of Time both won for editorial excellence as Single-Topic Issues.

In September 2003 the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies honored Rennie with its Navigator Award for distinguished service in support of national science and technology policy. In 2000 the Council of Scientific Society Presidents bestowed on Rennie its Sagan Award for Public Understanding of Science, which is given annually “to honor those who have become concurrently accomplished as researchers and/or educators, and as widely recognized magnifiers of the public's understanding of science.”

Rennie received his B.S. degree from Yale University in 1981, after which he worked for several years in a laboratory at Harvard Medical School before embarking on his career as a science writer. His writing has appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, Longevity, and other publications. His numerous television and radio appearances include the ABC World News Weekend, PBS Newshour with Jim Lehrer, Entertainment Tonight, CBS Early Show, and National Public Radio’s Science Friday.

Scientific American, founded in 1845, is the foremost publication for individuals who want to understand the science and technology that is shaping our world. Editorial contributors have included over 130 Nobel laureates, among them Albert Einstein, Neils Bohr, Francis Crick, Stanley Prusiner and Harold Varmus. Scientific American, Inc. is a division of Holtzbrinck Publishers, a U.S. subsidiary of Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holtzbrinck GmbH, a privately held international media corporation operating in more than 40 countries.

Posted by David Lemberg at 07:50 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

April 05, 2007

Stephen Piccot, Director of Environment and Energy, Southern Research Institute, 4-5-07


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Stephen Piccot has more than 22 years experience executing and managing environmental research projects for the U.S. EPA, the U.S. DOE, state regulatory agencies, industry trade organizations, government associations, private industry, and consulting firms. As director of the Environment and Energy Department at Southern Research Institute, he manages four research operations located in Alabama, Florida and North Carolina.

Mr. Piccot has managed GHG research projects in areas of methane and nitrous oxide source emission measurements, development of GHG source measurement methods, site-specific control technology evaluations for coal mining operations and electric utilities, CO2 emission and energy forecast model development, and GHG inventory development and policy analysis. He is uniquely familiar with the testing requirements and technologies associated with sources of emissions in the coal, oil, gas, landfill, refrigeration, IC Engine, distributed generation, and other industries. He also has experience with source-specific engineering and economic analyses and field demonstrations of emission control technologies.

Since 1997, Mr. Piccot has advised several global organizations on technology performance verification issues, including the World Bank, the Secretariat of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the U.S. EPA, Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada, The Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce-New Deli, the Center for the Advancement of Energy Markets, and others. He earned a B.S. in Environmental Engineering from California Polytechnic State University, where he has also completed graduate-level course work in Environmental Engineering.

Southern Research Institute is a not-for-profit organization that conducts basic and applied research in the areas of preclinical drug discovery and drug development, advanced engineering, environmental and energy production. To date, Southern Research has discovered six FDA-approved cancer drugs and discovered four additional drugs that are currently in clinical trials.

Southern Research conducts basic and applied research for both public and private organizations. Clients include the National Institute of Health, the U.S. Departments of Justice, Defense and Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and NASA. Southern Research works with major commercial clients in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, automotive, energy and manufacturing sectors.

Posted by David Lemberg at 07:37 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

March 22, 2007

Matt Clouse, Director, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Green Power Partnership, 3-22-07


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Matt Clouse is Director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Green Power Partnership. This voluntary, climate protection program seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by building demand for renewable power. EPA’s growing numbers of Green Power Partners are purchasing more than seven billion kilowatt-hours of renewable power annually. This electricity would be equivalent to roughly ten billion pounds of CO2 if generated by conventional means.

Matt joined the EPA in late 2000 to begin developing the Green Power Partnership, which was launched in July 2001. Almost six years later, the Partnership has over 650 partners including 310 organizations or facilities buying green power for 100% of their electricity usage, 83 government agencies, 70 colleges & universities, and 39 Fortune 500 companies.

The broader voluntary market has grown with EPA’s focus on building demand for green power among corporate, governmental and institutional electricity consumers. Now non-residential sales drive market growth and the market supports over 3000 MW of new renewable power capacity.

Matt’s career in environmental and energy policy began in Oregon at an environmental lab and includes five years at the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and two years at the University of Delaware where he received a Masters of Energy And Environmental Policy and led teams tasked with developing Delaware’s climate change action plan and the state’s energy plan.

Posted by David Lemberg at 08:55 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

February 22, 2007

Dr. Sarah Arsenault, Senior Research Engineer, United Technologies Corporation, 2-22-07


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Dr. Sarah Arsenault is a Senior Research Engineer involved in cutting edge industrial research at the central R&D center of United Technologies Corporation. In this capacity, she has taken on task leadership roles for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Storage technologies. She became interested in engineering from an early age, always asking the questions of “why” and “how does it work”.

The Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Team and Dr. Arsenault was recognized in 2005 for innovative development of SOFC stack technology for power generation of the future, culminating in successful design and demonstration of a 1-kilowatt cell stack. Safe, effective storage of hydrogen is a critical objective for the development of automotive fuel cells. Dr. Arsenault was responsible for driving the design and development of a subscale Hydrogen Storage Prototype System for fuel cell vehicles.

When not developing next generation environmentally-friendly products, you might find Dr. Arsenault active in the local chapter of AIChE or out on the slopes. She hopes to get back to racing slalom with the Connecticut Industrial Ski Council once she finishes her MBA.

Founded in 1929, United Technologies Research Center delivers the world's most advanced technologies, innovative thinking and disciplined research to customers that are industry leaders in aerospace propulsion, building infrastructure and services, heating and air conditioning, fire and security systems, and power generation. UTRC researchers partner with all the business units of United Technologies Corporation, as well as with government agencies, independent organizations, leading universities and centers of technological excellence across the globe. UTRC employs approximately 500 scientists, engineers, technicians and support staff with headquarters in East Hartford, CT, and a research facility in Shanghai, China.

American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2008, is a professional society of more than 40,000 chemical engineers in 92 countries. Its members work in corporations, universities and government using their knowledge of chemical processes to develop safe and useful products for the benefit of society.

Through its varied programs, AIChE continues to be a focal point for information exchange on the frontier of chemical engineering research in such areas as nanotechnology, sustainability, hydrogen fuels, biological and environmental engineering, and chemical plant safety and security.

Posted by David Lemberg at 07:23 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

February 14, 2007

John Horning, Executive Director, Forest Guardians, 2-15-07


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Founded in 1989, Forest Guardians has emerged as a results-driven group with a proven record of defending and preserving threatened southwestern wildlife and ecosystems. The organization's approach to conservation features a potent combination of scientific analysis, strategic litigation to enforce existing environmental laws, and efforts to reform public polices.

Forest Guardians' goals are to

  • Protect and restore the native biological diversity and watersheds of the American Southwest

  • Educate and enlist citizens to support protection of the forests, rivers, deserts and grasslands of this arid region

  • Advocate for the principles of conservation biology in plans to restore degraded ecosystems and watersheds

  • Enforce and strengthen environmental laws

  • Support communities in efforts to protect their land

  • Practice and promote sustainable use of natural resources
  • John Horning has been with Forest Guardians since 1994 and became the Executive Director in April 2002. During his tenure, he has worked in a variety of positions including grazing program director, watershed protection program director and conservation director. He has had extensive campaign and litigation experience working on western water, grazing, endangered species and land-use management issues in addition to his development and administrative responsibilities. The Wilburforce Foundation recently recognized him with its annual outstanding conservation leadership award.

    mmediately prior to coming to New Mexico, Mr. Horning worked for 2.5 years in Washington D.C. for the National Wildlife Federation on public lands and western resource issues.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 04:14 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    February 07, 2007

    Tracy Mehan, Principal, The Cadmus Group, 2-8-07


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    G. Tracy Mehan, III, is Principal with The Cadmus Group, an environmental consulting firm, with offices in Arlington, VA.

    Mr. Mehan served as Assistant Administrator for Water at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 2001-2003 pursuant to presidential nomination and senate confirmation. In that capacity he directed both the Clean Water and Safe Drinking Water Acts programs including permitting, infrastructure finance, wetlands regulation, standards and watershed management. During his tenure as Assistant Administrator, Mr. Mehan developed new policies and guidances on watershed-based permitting and water quality trading. He also promoted expanded ambient water quality monitoring and innovative approaches to meeting the challenge of the infrastructure financing gap. He served as Environmental Stewardship Counselor to the 2004 G-8 Summit Planning Organization (2004).

    Mr. Mehan also served as director of the Michigan Office of the Great Lakes and a member of then Governor John Engler’s Cabinet (1993-2001). He represented the State of Michigan in all matters relating to Great Lakes Water diversions under the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 and the Great Lakes Charter, and led the Michigan negotiating team during the mediation of disputes relating to exceedances of Supreme Court mandated limits on the Chicago Diversion of Lake Michigan water. He also was Michigan’s representative on the Great Lakes Commission and the Water Quality Board of the International Joint Commission established under the Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909 between the U.S. and Canada. In addition, he chaired the Michigan Mercury Pollution Prevention Task Force which, among other things, negotiated a phase out of 9.8 metric tons of mercury used in auto switches, annually, by the Big Three auto companies.

    Mr. Mehan also served, briefly, as Associate Deputy Administrator of EPA in 1992. He served as director of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources and member of the Cabinet of then Governor John Ashcroft from 1989 to 1992. In that capacity he managed the state’s environmental, parks, historic preservation, geology and other programs. He represented the State of Missouri in all negotiations over the management of the Missouri River and the development of a proposed Master Manual as well as matters pertaining to water diversions including tribal reserved water rights potentially impacting main stem flows downstream. He negotiated the Times Beach cleanup settlement and implemented what was then the largest rails-to-trails conversion in the country, the 200 mile long KATY Trail.

    He is the recipient of the 2004 Environment Award from the Association of Metropolitan Sewerage Agencies (AMSA) and the 2003 Elizabeth Jester Fellows Environmental Partnership Award from the Association of State & Interstate Water Pollution Control Administrators (ASWIPCA). Presently, Mr. Mehan is serving on the Committee on the Mississippi River and the Clean Water Act for the National Research Council of the National Academies.

    Mr. Mehan is a graduate of Saint Louis University and its School of Law. He is an Adjunct Professor in Environmental Law at George Mason University School of Law. He is a member of the Water Environment Federation and the Environmental Law Institute.

    Founded in 1983, employee-owned The Cadmus Group helps government, nonprofit, and corporate clients address critical challenges in the environmental and energy sectors. Cadmus provides an array of research and analytical services in the United States and abroad, specializing in solving complex problems that demand innovative, multidisciplinary thinking. Among Cadmus’ major practice areas are Drinking Water and Water Quality, Communications and Social Marketing, Energy Services (including energy efficiency and renewable energy), Risk Assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment and Environmentally Sound Design, and Environmental Management.

    The Cadmus staff includes scientists; engineers; statisticians; economists; MBAs; marketing, public relations, and communications professionals; attorneys; information technology specialists; and public policy analysts. Many of our senior consultants are nationally recognized experts in their fields and several serve on high-level U.S. government science advisory boards.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 02:12 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    Dr. Summer Johnson, Director, Ethics in Novel Technologies, Research, and Innovation Program, Alden March Bioethics Institute, 2-8-07


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    Dr. Summer Johnson is the Director of the Ethics in Novel Technologies, Research, and Innovation Program at the Alden March Bioethics Institute (AMBI) in Albany, NY. Dr. Johnson is Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Albany Medical College as well as Interim Director of Graduate Studies at AMBI, where she runs an online Masters of Science degree in Bioethics.

    The Alden March Bioethics Institute (AMBI) is a multi-institutional bioethics research institute based at the Albany Medical College and its Medical Center, and directed by Dr. Glenn McGee. AMBI was founded in 2005 to conduct state-of-the-art research, teaching and outreach concerning ethical issues in the health sciences.

    AMBI conducts a comprehensive and innovative bioethics research and education program through Faculty and Fellows representing the unique educational, research and government institutions in New York's capital district.

    Institute faculty receive in excess of $3 million in bioethics research dollars, and produce and disseminate widely cited scholarship in medical, legal, philosophical and scientific journals and books. AMBI offers a unique online masters program in bioethics as well joint degree programs in law, medicine, pastoral care, public health and social work.

    The Institute is home to the leading peer-reviewed journal in bioethics, The American Journal of Bioethics, and to the world's most utilized bioethics resource on the Internet, bioethics.net. It publishes the most-read bioethics news and opinion resource, The Editors Blog of The American Journal of Bioethics, better known as blog.bioethics.net.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 02:06 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    February 01, 2007

    Dr. Michael Fernandez, Executive Director, Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology, 2-1-07


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    Michael Fernandez, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology. Since joining the Initiative when it launched in early 2001, Dr. Fernandez has served as the Initiative’s Director of Science. In that role, he oversaw the Initiative’s research into scientific questions generated by agricultural biotechnology, including the reports, workshops and conferences prepared by Initiative staff.

    Previously, Dr. Fernandez served as the Associate Administrator for the Agricultural Marketing Service at the United States Department of Agriculture where he was responsible for all science and technology programs, including agricultural biotechnology and the implementation of the National Organic Standards Program.

    The Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology was established in 2001 to be an independent and objective source of credible information on agricultural biotechnology for the public, media and policymakers. Funded through a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts to the University of Richmond, the Initiative advocates neither for, nor against, agricultural biotechnology. Instead, the Initiative is committed to providing information and encouraging debate and dialogue so that consumers and policymakers can make their own informed decisions.

    Consumer confidence in the ability of the regulatory system to ensure food safety and protect the environment is critical to the success or failure of agricultural biotechnology. For that reason, the Initiative supports informed public dialogue on ways that the regulatory system may need to evolve to address the issues posed by the continued development of this new technology and the growing body of scientific knowledge.

    The Initiative produces reports and sponsors workshops and conferences to showcase the diverse points of view that recognized experts have on the broad array of topics relevant to the debate about agricultural biotechnology. The reports and workshop products are disseminated widely and are made available through the Initiative’s web site so the public, the media and policymakers can have equal access to information. Through collaborations with other organizations, the Initiative also aims to encourage debate and dialogue about the scientific, economic, marketing, and regulatory issues relevant to agricultural biotechnology.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 12:18 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    January 25, 2007

    Richard M Hansen, Director of Engineering and Division Manager, DMJM H&N, 1-25-07


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    Richard Hansen completed a part time M.B.A. in 1996 while working full-time which was shortly followed by a 2-year posting to Singapore for Oscar Faber, where he established a successful MEP practice along side the existing structural practice. While in Singapore Richard was involved in the design and delivery of system-integrated buildings (intelligent buildings) which were designed to optimize occupational usability and environmental performance. He returned to the UK in 1999 and later that year transferred to the London office becoming Business Unit Director in 2002. In this role he was responsible for the administration, management and technical standards for a multi-disciplinary group of engineers and specialists engaged on the design of environmental systems on a range of projects largely centered around the commercial office and media sectors. He also had responsibility for the integration and coordination of the engineer practices with the Sustainable Development Group. He completed another part-time Masters Degree in Property Valuation and Law in 2005 to gain a wider understanding of the financial structure of the property industry.

    In 2006 Richard transferred to DMJM H&N in the U.S. where he is now Division Manager for the Orange office with responsibility for an architectural and engineering production team of over 70. He also is Director of Engineering with responsibility for the coordination of the national engineering capability for the company and the adoption of holistic and integrated approaches to building design. The role included responsibility for the adoption and coordination of global best practices in engineering and building design.

    DMJM H&N was formed in 2000 by the merger of two AECOM companies (Daniel, Mann, Johnson, & Mendenhall and Holmes & Narver) to create one of the most powerful design organizations in the world. DMJM H&N provides a broad range of planning, architectural, engineering, and construction services through our professionals stationed worldwide. Firm headquarters are located in Los Angeles with operating offices in Orange, San Francisco, San Diego, Phoenix, Albuquerque, Houston, Miami (Coral Cables), Chicago, Columbus, New York, Washington D.C., Denver, Colorado Springs, Fort Worth, Dallas, Detroit, Los Alamos, Richland, and Kuwait City.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 11:59 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    January 22, 2007

    Scott Molony, Steven Arcangeli, and Scott Horton, Oak Ridge High School, Oak Ridge, TN — Gold Medal ($100,000) National Team Scholarship, 2006-2007 Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology — 1-26-07


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    The Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology has become the nation’s premiere math, science and technology research competition for high school students. The Competition, which is administered by the College Board, provides high school students and schools an opportunity to achieve national recognition for original math, science and technology research projects.

    National individual and team winners receive scholarships ranging from $10,000 up to a top prize of $100,000. Schools receive a $2,000 award for each individual or team project selected as a regional finalist.

    Scott J. Molony, a senior, is a member of his high school cross-country team, editor-in-chief of the school literary magazine, and a varsity member of the Scholar’s Bowl Academic Team. His favorite subjects include Calculus II and Modern European History. Possible college majors include philosophy/theology, Japanese and mathematics.

    Steven Arcangeli, a senior, was a finalist in the National Chemistry Olympiad last year. His high school team finished 20th nationally in the National Science Olympiad. Mr. Arcangeli is a member of the National Honor Society, Math Club and Science Club. He expects to major in materials engineering in college.

    Scott Horton, a senior, became interested in science because of his parents, who both work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He was a member of the second place regional team in the Physics Bowl and plans to major in engineering in college.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 10:33 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    December 18, 2006

    Dr. Terri Stewart, Lead, Environmental Biomarkers Initiative, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 6-7-06


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    The Environmental Biomarkers Initiative at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is designed to lead the transformation of environmental management from a descriptive to a predictive science. Dr. Terri Stewart is responsible for implementing the Initiative’s research agenda: predicting ecosystem change and damage, answering questions around engineered nanomaterials and their impact on human and ecosystem health, and developing rapid and pre-symptomatic screening methods for zoonotic agents.

    Previously, Dr. Stewart was Vice President of Battelle’s Core Technology Organization, where she led the integrated business and technology development strategy for nano- and microtechnologies. She received the R&D 100 Award in 1991 for the Waste Acid Detoxification and Reclamation technology.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 11:17 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    December 07, 2006

    Dr. Paul MacCready, Founder and Chairman of the Board, AeroVironment, Inc., 12-8-06


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    n 1971, Dr. MacCready founded AeroVironment, Inc., a diversified company headquartered in Monrovia, CA. The company provides services, developments, and products in the fields of alternative energy, power electronics, and energy efficient vehicles for operation on land and in air and water. He is Chairman of the Board of AeroVironment, and active in all the newer technology areas.

    Dr. MacCready became internationally known in 1977 as the "father of human-powered flight" when his Gossamer Condor made the first sustained, controlled flight by a heavier-than-air craft powered solely by its pilot's muscles. For the feat he received the $95,000 Henry Kremer Prize established in 1959. Two years later, his team created the Gossamer Albatross, another 70-pound craft with a 96 foot wingspan that, with DuPont sponsorship, achieved a human-powered flight across the English Channel. That flight, made by "pilot-engine" Bryan Allen, took almost three hours. It won the new Kremer prize of $213,000, at the time the largest cash prize in aviation history. Some years later, first with DOD and then NASA support, his teams moved Solar Challenger technology into a series of solar-powered stratospheric fliers. The 100' Pathfinder achieved 71,500' in 1997. The 120' Pathfinder Plus climbed over 80,000 feet in 1998. August 2001 the giant 247' Helios reached 96,863' – over 2 miles higher than any plane had ever sustained level flight! Development is ongoing for a system that can provide power for several weeks at 65,000 feet without solar cells. Eventually, such non-polluting fliers will probe conditions in the stratosphere, perform surveillance, and serve as 11 mile high, station-keeping “SkyTower™” radio relays for multichannel, wide bandwidth telecommunications.

    Dr. MacCready’s team's first land vehicle was the GM Sunraycer, for which AeroVironment provided project management, systems engineering, aerodynamics and structural design, power electronics development, as well as construction and testing for General Motors and Hughes Aircraft. In November 1987, this solar-powered car won the 1,867 mile race across Australia, averaging 41.6 mph (50 percent faster than the second place vehicle in the field of 24 contestants). The goal of the Sunraycer, in addition to winning the race, was to advance transportation technology that makes fewer demands on the earth's resources and environment, and to inspire students to become engineers. In January 1990, the GM Impact was introduced, a battery-powered sports car with snappy "0 to 60 mph in 8 seconds" performance. GM later turned the Impact into the production vehicle EV 1. In 1985 the AeroVironment team had proposed to GM the initial concept for the Impact. In 1988-89 GM supported AeroVironment to handle program management, systems engineering, design of the electrical and mechanical elements, and build the vehicle, integrating the participation of a dozen GM divisions. This pioneering car became a catalyst for the initial California Zero Emission Vehicle Mandate and the related global developments of battery-powered and alternatively-fueled vehicles.

    The unique vehicles produced by MacCready's teams have received international attention through exhibits, books, television documentaries, and innumerable articles and cover stories in magazines and newspapers. They, MacCready, and AeroVironment have become symbols for creativity. The Gossamer Condor, Gossamer Albatross, Solar Challenger, QN, Sunraycer, and Pathfinder Plus were all donated to the Smithsonian. The Gossamer Condor is on permanent display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. A film about it, "The Flight of the Gossamer Condor", won the Academy Award for Best Documentary - Short Subject in 1978.

    Dr. MacCready's achievements have brought him many honors, including the Lifetime Achievement Aviation Week Laureate Award He was included in Time magazine’s “The Century’s Greatest Minds” series “on the 100 most influential people of the century”.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 01:32 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    November 15, 2006

    Dr. Doug Nelson, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, 11-17-06


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    Dr. Doug Nelson, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech, teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Fuel Cell Systems, Hydrogen Energy Systems, Advanced Technology Vehicles and Design.

    Dr. Nelson also is co-director of the Department of Energy GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems, a multidisciplinary graduate automotive engineering program that focuses on technologies critical to the development of fuel-efficient/low-emission vehicles.

    He has expertise in modeling, testing, and validation of fuel cell and hybrid electric vehicles. Dr. Nelson is the founding advisor of the Virginia Tech Hybrid Electric Vehicle Team (HEVT), a student organization that designs and builds hybrid electric and alternative-fueled vehicles for advanced vehicle technology competitions. Since 1994 the HEVT has participated in national student-designed vehicle competitions sponsored by DOE and U.S. automakers.

    Under Dr. Nelson's guidance, the HEVT has won a number of awards while participating in the previous FutureCar and FutureTruck challenges. During those competitions, Dr. Nelson and his student teams created the world's first student-designed fuel-cell-powered car and sports utility vehicle (SUV). In June 2006, the team placed first in the second-year competition of Challenge X, sponsored by DOE and General Motors. The HEVT re-engineered a Chevrolet Equinox SUV into an ethanol-powered hybrid vehicle.

    In 1996 the Society of Automotive Engineers presented Nelson with the Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award in recognition of his outstanding contributions as one of the nation's top engineering educators in the field of automotive technology. In 1998 he received the National Science Foundation's FutureCar Challenge Faculty Advisor of the Year Award, and in 2005 he received NSF's Outstanding Long-Term Faculty Advisor Award.

    Dr. Nelson earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in mechanical engineering at Virginia Tech and his Ph.D. at Arizona State University.

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering is one of the largest departments within Virginia Tech's College of Engineering, awarding approximately 220 undergraduate, 60 masters of Science, and 10 Doctoral degrees annually. Virginia Tech's programs in Mechanical Engineering are consistently ranked in the top 10-15% of Mechanical Engineering Departments in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. Currently, the Virginia Tech graduate program is ranked 20th in the nation, and its undergraduate program is ranked 17th nationally.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 01:40 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    November 13, 2006

    Terry Tamminen, Author, Lecturer, and Strategist on Energy and the Environment, 11-13-06


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    In the summer of 2003, Terry Tamminen helped Arnold Schwarzenegger win the historic recall election and become Governor of California. He became Secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency in November 2003 and was promoted to Cabinet Secretary, Chief Policy Advisor to the Governor, in December 2004.

    During his tenure with Governor Schwarzenegger, Mr. Tamminen helped launch some of the most progressive, successful, and laudable sustainable energy initiatives in the country. The environmental changes he implemented have left California a cleaner, healthier state with a cutting-edge reputation for policies that work for the good of the land and its citizens. In August 2006, Mr. Tamminen left the Schwarzenegger administration to focus on Lives Per Gallon.

    In 1993, Mr. Tamminen founded the Santa Monica BayKeeper and served as its Executive Director for six years. He co-founded Waterkeeper programs in San Diego, Orange County, Ventura, and Santa Barbara. He also served for five years as Executive Director of the Environment Now Foundation in Santa Monica, CA.

    From his youth in Australia to career experiences in Europe, Africa, and all parts of the United States, Mr. Tamminen has developed expertise in business, farming, education, non-profit, the environment, the arts, and government. He has studied conch depletion in the Bahamas, manatee populations in Florida coastal waters, and mariculture in the Gulf States with Texas A&M University.

    Mr. Tamminen has authored numerous technical papers and several theatrical works on the life of William Shakespeare. He is a United States Coast Guard–licensed ship captain and an avid airplane and helicopter pilot. He has also served on numerous civic and charitable boards and commissions, including Chair of the Public Advisory Committee to the Southern California Wetlands Recovery Project, and on the U.S. Navy Pt. Mugu Naval Air Station Restoration Advisory Board, the Los Angeles/Long Beach Harbor Safety Committee and on the Board of the Wishtoyo Foundation, a group that preserves natural resources through Chumash Indian traditional teachings.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 10:08 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    November 09, 2006

    Chuck Waterfield, Founder, MFI Solutions, 11-10-06


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    Chuck Waterfield was educated as an Electrical Engineer and then returned to study economic development for his masters degree. He has worked for over 20 years in the area of microfinance in the developing countries of the world. Due to his work in this field, he has lived in Haiti, Bolivia, the Dominican Republic, and Mexico, and has traveled to over 50 countries of the developing world. After heading up the microfinance work in two international non-profits, Mr. Waterfield started his own consulting company ten years ago. He has developed “Microfin”, the most widely used financial projection and planning software for microfinance institutions, and he travels around the world training senior managers in how to develop business plans and use the software.

    MFI Solutions is a consulting agency specializing in providing practical management assistance to microfinance institutions around the world. The company was started in 1998 by Chuck Waterfield, is based in Lancaster, PA, and contracts eight to ten additional consultants each year. MFI Solutions is best known for “Microfin”, used by the majority of microfinance institutions in their annual and long-range planning processes.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 08:15 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    November 01, 2006

    The Honorable Debra Bowen, California State Senator (D, Redondo Beach), 11-3-06


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    A lawmaker for more than a decade, Senator Debra Bowen continues to focus her attention on helping Californians improve their quality of life. Helping people take part in our democracy and get access to state government, giving them tools to protect their privacy and their pocketbook, and investing in California's natural resources and its children are the underlying themes that sum up Senator Bowen’s overall approach to being a state lawmaker.

    Born in Rockford, Illinois, Bowen graduated from Michigan State University in 1976 and earned her law degree from the University of Virginia in 1979. In 1984, she started her own California law firm specializing in small business start-ups, tax law, land use, and environmental issues, while her long history of community activism began when she got involved with her local Neighborhood Watch program. Bowen was elected to represent the 53rd Assembly District in 1992 and was re-elected in 1994 and 1996 before being elected to represent the 28th Senate District in 1998. Bowen was re-elected to her second and final four-year Senate term in 2002, representing the reapportioned 28th District which stretches from Venice in the north, down the coast to Redondo Beach, then east to include all or parts of Carson, San Pedro, Long Beach, and Wilmington.

    Senator Bowen’s SB 370 (2005) requires all election results to be audited using the paper record produced by the new electronic voting machines. Her landmark, first-in-the-nation SB 168 (2001) makes it much more difficult for criminals to commit identity theft. Regarding protecting the environment and energy resources, Senator Bowen’s SB 1298 (2000) required the Air Resources Board to adopt strict emissions standards for distributed power generation facilities. Her SB 1143 (2002) sought to require the California Energy Commission to significantly increase the amount of renewable electrical power generated in the state.

    Senator Bowen is the chairwoman of the Senate Elections, Reapportionment & Constitutional Amendments Committee and serves on the Energy, Utilities & Communications and Rules committees.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 03:12 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 19, 2006

    Professor Cliff Davidson, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 10-20-06


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    Dr. Cliff Davidson is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests and expertise include sustainability as it applies to engineering and the environment; mathematical modeling and measurement of particle dry deposition from the atmosphere onto vegetation, structures, and surrogate surfaces; the effect of air pollution on buildings and monuments; pollutants in remote areas; and use of glacial records to understand historical air pollution trends.

    Professor Davidson received an M.S. in Environmental Engineering Science at California Institute of Technology in 1973 and a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering Science at CalTech in 1977.

    The new Center for Sustainable Engineering is being created by a collaborative research team led by Carnegie Mellon University, The University of Texas at Austin, and Arizona State University. The center, supported by $1.7 million from the National Science Foundation and $350,000 from the Environmental Protection Agency, is designed to help future engineers better manage increased stress on the world’s limited resources.

    The Center for Engineering Sustainability plans to help galvanize engineering programs into action. Programs will include holding workshops to improve engineering faculty teaching, creating a Web site with peer-reviewed educational materials about sustainable engineering, and conducting a nationwide survey of sustainable engineering programs and courses to benchmark the status of education in this emerging discipline. The Center’s first workshops are scheduled for July 17-19, 2006, and July 19-21, 2006, at Carnegie Mellon.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 02:05 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 12, 2006

    Dr. Miles Drake, Vice President And Chief Technology Officer, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 10-13-06


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    Read the transcript of the SCIENCE AND SOCIETY interview with Dr. Miles Drake

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    Dr. Miles Drake earned a B.S. in chemistry from Cambridge University and a Ph.D. in surface and colloid chemistry from the University of Bristol. For 10 years, he worked at STL, a corporate laboratory of ITT in the United Kingdom, which focused on developing materials for electronic component manufacturing.

    Dr. Drake joined Air Products and Chemicals in 1986 as the technology manager for the company's European Electronics Research and Development group. Shortly after, he was appointed to technology director. In 1990 Dr. Drake relocated to the United States, where he became director of Advanced Technology for the Global Applications Development Group.

    Dr. Drake was later named director of the Corporate Science and Technology Center, followed by director of Gases and Equipment Group Technology. He assumed his current position as vice president and chief technology officer in 2001. Dr. Drake is also chairman-elect of the Industrial Research Institute and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:36 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    Dr. Frankie Wood-Black, Director of Consent Decree Compliance, ConocoPhillips, 10-13-06


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    Read the transcript of the SCIENCE AND SOCIETY interview with Dr. Frankie Wood-Black

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    Dr. Frankie Wood-Black is the Director of Consent Decree Compliance at ConocoPhillips. Her responsibilities are focused on supporting refinery compliance with the Benzene, Hazardous Air Pollutant, and Leak Detection and Repair regulations. Dr. Wood-Black also supports compliance with the Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Dr. Wood-Black received a B.S. in physics from Central State University (now the University of Central Oklahoma), a Ph.D. in physics, and an M.B.A. from Oklahoma State University. She was previously the Director of Business Services for Downstream Technology, the Technology Services marketing manager for Phillips Petroleum, and quality assurance team leader at the Borger Refinery and NGL Center.

    Dr. Wood-Black has been active in numerous professional activities and serves as the ConocoPhillips representative for Corporation Associates of the American Chemical Society. She is a contributing editor of the Journal for Chemical Health and Safety with her coauthored column, "CHAS Netways." Dr. Wood-Black has one patent, several technical publications, and has coauthored a book entitled Emergency Preparedness Planning—A Primer for Chemists. She regularly makes presentations at the American Chemical Society national meetings and is a registered environmental manager.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:33 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    Dr. Alan Baylis, President and CEO, Nuvistix Innovation, 10-13-06


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    Dr. Alan Baylis is President and CEO of Nuvistix Innovation, with a background in agriculture, specifically farming, crop science research, and agribusiness. Dr. Baylis earned his bachelor's and Ph.D. degrees in crop physiology from the University of Leeds and an M.B.A. from Henley Management College. He managed and worked on a farm for three years before joining the fertilizer division of Imperial Chemical Industries at Jealott's Hill International Research Centre in 1982.

    After developing technical services based on a model of winter wheat growth and development, Dr. Baylis moved to the Agrochemicals Division to lead research on plant growth regulators. His major goals were improving yield and quality of rice, maize, and soybeans. In 1992 Dr. Baylis began managing Zeneca's R&D on nonselective herbicides, covering not only field crops, but temperate and tropical fruit, and noncrop weed control. Biotechnology came to play an important role with developments in genetically modified crops resistant to glyphosate herbicide, the world's leading agrochemical.

    After working in technical marketing for Syngenta, Dr. Baylis established Nuvistix Innovation in 2004. He has been working closely with the Society of Chemical Industry to develop programs to promote interest in crop plants as sources of fuels, feedstocks, platform chemicals, and bioactive molecules.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:29 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 06, 2006

    Susan Hassler, Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Spectrum, 10-6-06


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    Susan Hassler, Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Spectrum, has more than 20 years of experience as a science editor and journalist dealing with a wide range of complex topics from developmental neurobiology to genetic and metabolic engineering. Her previous positions include the editorship of Nature Biotechnology, where she led the effort to reposition the publication and developed a number of brand extensions for it. She also served as editor at The Neurosciences Institute at Rockefeller University, associate editor for The Sciences, and a member of the editorial startup team at Quest Magazine. She has been an adjunct professor in the Science and Environmental Writing program at the New York University School of Journalism.

    IEEE Spectrum is the flagship publication of the IEEE, the world's largest technical professional society. Through its 365,000 members in 150 countries, the not-for-profit association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics. Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 percent of the world's literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed more than 900 active industry standards. The organization also sponsors or cosponsors more than 300 international technical conferences each year. The IEEE Fellow membership grade is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. The total number selected in any one year does not exceed one-tenth percent of the total voting IEEE membership.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:04 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    July 30, 2006

    Dr. Cyrus Mody, Program Manager for Nanotechnology and Innovation Studies in the Center for Contemporary History and Policy at the Chemical Heritage Foundation, 7-26-06


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    Dr. Cyrus Mody is the Program Manager for Nanotechnology and Innovation Studies in the Center for Contemporary History and Policy at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia, PA. His knowledge of nanomaterials is grounded in an A.B. in mechanical and materials engineering from Harvard University. His current research on the history of nanotechnology and corporate–academic relations in American science is an extension of his Ph.D. dissertation in Science and Technology Studies at Cornell University. He has published ethnographic and historical studies of nanotechnology, science pedagogy, and the commercialization of academic research in a variety of journals and edited volumes. His research has been sponsored at various times by the National Bureau of Economic Research, the National Science Foundation, the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at the University of California at Santa Barbara, the American Institute of Physics, the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

    The Center for Contemporary History and Policy at the Chemical Heritage Foundation carries out projects at the interface of contemporary chemical and molecular sciences and technologies, industry, and science policy. The center is built on the core principle that history and policy are domains that should inform one another. The center is structured around a group of programs that draw upon diverse historical and contemporary source materials to provide knowledge and advice to stakeholders from industry, academia, government, and citizen groups. The center’s programs record, characterize, and analyze the economic, health, and environmental changes associated with advances in science, technology, and medicine.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 12:03 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    July 20, 2006

    Dr. Bruce Dale, Professor of Chemical Engineering and former Chairperson of the Department Of Chemical Engineering at Michigan State University, 7-19-06


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    Professor Bruce Dale is Professor of Chemical Engineering and former Chairperson of the Department Of Chemical Engineering at Michigan State University. He received his B.S. (summa cum laude) in chemical engineering from the University of Arizona (Tucson) in 1974 and his M.S. from that same university in 1976. Dr. Dale then studied under Professor George T. Tsao at Purdue University, receiving his Ph.D. degree in 1979. Dr. Dale’s first academic position was in the Department of Agricultural and Chemical Engineering at Colorado State University, where he rose to the rank of professor in 1988. In that same year he joined Texas A&M University where he became Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Agricultural Engineering. Dr. Dale also directed two large interdisciplinary research centers at Texas A&M.

    In 1996 Dr. Dale became Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Chemical Engineering at Michigan State University, where he also holds an appointment in the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station. In 1996 he won the Charles D. Scott Award for contributions to the use of biotechnology to produce fuels, chemicals, and other industrial products from renewable plant resources. In 2001 he stepped down as chairperson to return to full-time research and teaching.

    Professor Dale’s research and professional interests lie at the intersection of chemical engineering and the life sciences. Specifically, he is interested in the environmentally sustainable conversion of plant matter to industrial products—fuels, chemicals, and materials—while still meeting human and animal needs for food and feed. He led a National Research Council report entitled “Biobased Industrial Products: Research and Commercialization Priorities” which was published in May 2000. Dr. Dale has authored more than 90 referred journal papers, is an active consultant to industry and expert witness, and holds thirteen U.S. and foreign patents.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 01:24 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    June 22, 2006

    Dr. Paul Anastas, Director, American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute, 6/21/06


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    Dr. Paul Anastas is the Director of the Green Chemistry Institute at the American Chemical Society. Until July 2004, Dr. Anastas served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) as Assistant Director for Environment. Prior to joining the White House in October of 1999, Dr. Anastas served as the Chief of the Industrial Chemistry Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency since 1989.

    Dr. Anastas, known as the "Father of Green Chemistry", was recognized in 2005 as one of the most influential people in science and technology in the “Scientific American 50”. He is the co-author/editor of nine scientific and technical books including Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice which outlined the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry and has been translated into five languages.

    Dr. Anastas is the recipient of the Joseph Seifter Award, the U.S. EPA's highest scientific award for risk reduction and risk assessment, and the Nolan Summer Award, for contributions to chemistry. He currently is a Visiting Professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of Nottingham, U.K., and serves on the editorial board of the journals Environmental Science and Technology, Green Chemistry, and Clean Technology and Environmental Policy.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:30 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    June 15, 2006

    Dr. Arthur Daemmrich, Director, Center for Contemporary History and Policy, Chemical Heritage Foundation, 6/14/06


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    Dr. Arthur Daemmrich is the director of the Center for Contemporary History and Policy at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia. He earned a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from Cornell University and a B.A. in History and Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania. The projects he supervises at CHF bring long-range perspectives to bear on issues in innovation, globalization, risk, health, and environmental policy.

    Dr. Daemmrich has held fellowships from the Social Science Research Council/Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies, the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and the Chemical Heritage Foundation. He has published on biotechnology policy and politics, the sociology of medicine, and pharmaceutical drug regulation, and is editor or author of three books.

    The Center for Contemporary History and Policy at the Chemical Heritage Foundation carries out projects at the interface of contemporary chemical and molecular sciences and technologies, industry, and science policy. The center is built on the core principle that history and policy are domains that should inform one another. The center is structured around a group of programs that draw upon diverse historical and contemporary source materials to provide knowledge and advice to stakeholders from industry, academia, government, and citizen groups. The center’s programs record, characterize, and analyze the economic, health, and environmental changes associated with advances in science, technology, and medicine.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 12:14 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    January 24, 2006

    Professor Cliff Davidson, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 1/18/06


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    Dr. Cliff Davidson is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests and expertise include sustainability as it applies to engineering and the environment; mathematical modeling and measurement of particle dry deposition from the atmosphere onto vegetation, structures, and surrogate surfaces; and use of glacial records to understand historical air pollution trends.

    The new Center for Sustainable Engineering is being created by a collaborative research team led by Carnegie Mellon University, The University of Texas at Austin, and Arizona State University. The center, supported by $1.7 million from the National Science Foundation and $350,000 from the Environmental Protection Agency, is designed to help future engineers better manage increased stress on the world’s limited resources.

    The Center for Engineering Sustainability plans to help galvanize engineering programs into action. Programs will include holding workshops to improve engineering faculty teaching, creating a Web site with peer-reviewed educational materials about sustainable engineering, and conducting a nationwide survey of sustainable engineering programs and courses to benchmark the status of education in this emerging discipline. The Center’s first workshops are scheduled for July 17-19, 2006, and July 19-21, 2006, at Carnegie Mellon.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 04:31 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    December 15, 2005

    The Honorable M. Michael Rounds, Governor of South Dakota, 12/14/05


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    Part one of our conversation on the Homestake Underground Laboratory Project, solar neutrino research, K-12 science education, and basic and applied science in South Dakota

    Governor Mike Rounds discusses the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (Lead, SD), and the South Dakota 2010 Initiative. Goal Three of the 2010 Initiative relates to securing the Homestake Mine for use as an underground science laboratory, and developing research and technology infrastructure at South Dakota universities and with the private sector.

    In 2004, working with legislators, state employees, and South Dakotans, Governor Rounds has already

  • Created the Homestake Underground Laboratory project

  • Increased state funding for public universities by more than $7.5M and for public technical institutes by more than $1.6M

  • Increased state aid for local public schools by more than $10.2M in ongoing funding, as well as an additional $7.3M in one-time funding

  • Overhauled the state aid to education formula and increasing the state’s share of funding from less than 30 percent to more than 50 percent of the general education budget
  • Posted by David Lemberg at 04:07 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    November 01, 2005

    Dr. David Applegate, Senior Science Advisor for Earthquake and Geologic Hazards, U.S. Geological Survey, 8/5/05


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    Dr. David Applegate leads the Earthquake Hazards, Global Seismographic Network, and Geomagnetism Programs and provides coordination for geologic hazards activities across the U.S. Geological Survey. He also serves as Vice-Chair of the National Science and Technology Council's interagency Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction. In addition to his USGS duties, Dr. Applegate is an adjunct faculty member of the University of Utah's Department of Geology and Geophysics, and an instructor in the Environmental Sciences and Policy master's program at The Johns Hopkins Univesity.

    Dr. Applegate received a Presidential Certificate of Merit from the American Institute of Professional Geologists in 2002, and has recently received the Public Service Award from the Geological Society of America (October 2005).

    Created by an act of Congress in 1879, the U.S. Geologic Survey has evolved over the ensuing 120 years, matching its talent and knowledge to the progress of science and technology. Today, the USGS stands as the sole science agency for the Department of the Interior. It is sought out by thousands of partners and customers for its natural science expertise and its vast earth and biological data holdings. The USGS is the science provider of choice in accessing the information and understanding to help resolve complex natural resource problems across the Nation and around the world.

    The USGS serves as an independent fact-finding agency that collects, monitors, analyzes, and provides scientific understanding about natural resource conditions, issues, and problems. The value of the USGS rests on its ability to carry out studies on a national scale and to sustain long-term monitoring and assessment of natural resources. Because it has no regulatory or management mandate, the USGS provides impartial science that serves the needs of our changing world. The diversity of scientific expertise enables the USGS to carry out large-scale, multidisciplinary investigations that build the base of knowledge about the Earth. In turn, decision makers at all levels of government—and citizens in all walks of life—have the information tools they need to address pressing societal issues.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 11:50 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 27, 2005

    Dr. Gerald Stokes, Vice President for International Partnerships, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 10/26/05


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    Dr. Gerry Stokes was the founder and first Director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a unique partnership between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland. PNNL is a DOE Office of Science National Laboratory that solves complex problems in energy, national security, the environment, and life sciences. Ohio-based Battelle has managed PNNL since the Laboratory's inception in 1965. JGCRI members are renowned for expertise in energy conservation and its understanding of the interactions between climate, energy production and use, economic activity, and the environment.

    Dr. Stokes has served on multiple scientific and educational advisory boards throughout his career, including the National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment, and the NRC Committee for “Support for Spatial Thinking: The Incorporation of Geographic Information Science Across the K-12 Curriculum”. He currently serves on the committee on “Test Design for K-12 Achievement”.

    Dr. Stokes's research interests include climate and the design of large-scale field research facilities. He has authored or co-authored more than 80 book chapters, journal articles, and reports on topics ranging from the interstellar medium, atmospheric spectroscopy, energy utilization, and climate policy.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 04:44 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index