February 22, 2007

David C. Brock, Senior Research Fellow, Center for Contemporary History and Policy, Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2-22-07


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David C. Brock is a Senior Research Fellow with the Center for Contemporary History and Policy of the Chemical Heritage Foundation. As an historian of science and technology, he specializes in oral history, the history of instrumentation, and the history of semiconductor science, technology, and industry. Brock has studied the philosophy, sociology, and history of science at Brown University, the University of Edinburgh, and Princeton University (respectively and chronologically). His most recent publication is Understanding Moore’s Law: Four Decades of Innovation (Philadelphia, Chemical Heritage Press, 2006), which he edited and to which he contributed.

With Christophe Lécuyer, Brock has co-authored two articles in 2006 on the broad subject of what he calls the “chemical history of electronics”: a paper for the journal History and Technology titled “The Materiality of Microelectronics”, and a brief biography of Gordon E. Moore for the journal Annals of the History of Computing.

Since 2004, Brock has published nine short articles in Chemical Heritage Magazine on the chemical history of electronics. In the area of public history, Brock has curated two exhibits for the Chemical Heritage Foundation: an exhibit on the history of instrumentation titled “Revolutionary Tools: Instrumentation and the Transformation of the Chemical Sciences” and a major traveling exhibit on the history of women in chemistry titled “Her Lab in Your Life”.
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Posted by David Lemberg at 07:27 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

February 14, 2007

Dr. Katie Hunt, 2007 President, American Chemical Society, 2-15-07


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Catherine T. (Katie) Hunt is the 2007 President of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. She is also an employee of Rohm and Haas in Spring House, PA. She is Leader of Technology Partnerships (Emerging Technologies) for Rohm and Haas and her background is in catalysis and inorganic chemistry. In her 23 years in industry, Dr. Hunt has applied her background in these two areas across a broad range of electronics, materials, catalysis, hydrogen, coatings and health care.

Dr. Hunt received an A.B. degree in chemistry (cum laude with honors) in 1977 from Smith College in Massachusetts and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Davis, in 1981. An ACS member since 1977, Dr. Hunt has been involved in numerous Society activities, including membership in the Philadelphia Local Section and the Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry and Inorganic Chemistry.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization, chartered by the U.S. Congress, with a multidisciplinary membership of more than 158,000 chemists and chemical engineers. ACS publishes numerous scientific journals and databases, convenes major research conferences and provides educational, science policy and career programs in chemistry. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, OH.

ACS is a strong and successful advocate for the chemical sciences from education to legislation; an important hub of technical activities from meetings to publications and from divisions to websites; and a growing pool of resources from networks to workshops.

Posted by David Lemberg at 04:18 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

February 07, 2007

Dr. Al Kolb, President, The Society for Biomolecular Sciences, 2-8-07


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Read the transcript of the SCIENCE AND SOCIETY interview with Dr. Al Kolb

Dr. Al Kolb is President of The Society for Biomolecular Sciences and President of the drug discovery consulting firm KeyTech Solutions. He has worked for Beckman, Packard and a number of smaller companies specializing in assay technologies and automation. Dr. Kolb received his doctorate from the University of California, Irvine, in molecular biology and biochemistry, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Roche Institute for Molecular Biology.

Throughout his career, Dr. Kolb has been involved with high-throughput screening—specifically, in the development of assay technologies, microplates, readers, imagers, liquid handling and automation, with a special interest in assay miniaturization. As a consultant, he has continued working in these areas to assist companies in evaluating, developing and launching new drug discovery technologies.

Dr. Kolb was one of the organizers of SBS and served twice on the society’s Board of Directors, including the first Board He has continued to support and serve the Society in various capacities, including the annual conference, his current tenure as President, and as a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Biomolecular Screening.

# The Society for Biomolecular Sciences (SBS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the science and art of biomolecular screening internationally. Incorporated in September 1994, SBS is focused on promoting contacts, education and professionalism among the specialists that comprise this new multidisciplinary field. In 12 years SBS has succeeded in building membership to over 2000 scientists and specialists from over 24 countries. Members are kept abreast of new developments related to

  • The design and implementation of assay systems, computer applications and data management systems, instrumentation and robotics systems

  • The acquisition of test substance resources, including traditional, natural product, and combinatorial chemistry synthesis

  • Functional genomics and proteomics in biomolecular screening

  • High-throughput toxicology/ADME
  • Posted by David Lemberg at 02:15 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    February 01, 2007

    Dr. John Theibault, Education Manager, Roy Eddleman Institute for Interpretation and Education, Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2-1-07


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    Dr. John Theibault is Education Manager in the Roy Eddleman Institute for Interpretation and Education at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia. He has a BA in history from the University of California, Santa Cruz, an MBA from the University of Delaware, and an MA and PhD in history from the Johns Hopkins University. He has taught history at Loyola College of Maryland, Princeton University, the University of Oregon, and Lehigh University. He has received fellowships from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and the Max-Planck-Institut-für-Geschichte in Göttingen. He is the author of two books and more than a dozen articles in early modern European history. Before coming to CHF, he was Managing Director of Content Development for Digital Learning Interactive/iLrn, a pioneer in the development of online textbooks for the college market.

    As Education Manager in the Roy Eddleman Institute, John oversees the Chemical Heritage Foundation’s portfolio of online resources for students and teachers, (Science Alive!, Her Lab in Your Life: Women in Chemistry, Chemical Achievers, Pharmaceutical Achievers, and Explore Chemical History), workshops and conferences for stakeholders in science education (Leadership Initiative in Science Education – LISE), and collaborative projects with other content developers and educators.

    On February 6, 2007 at 8:00PM EST, NOVA will present Forgotten Genius: Percy Julian. CHF contributed background research to the program and has its own educational module Science Alive! The Life and Science of Percy Julian also based on that research.

    The Roy Eddleman Institute for Interpretation and Education is the outreach arm of the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The Institute’s outreach efforts are shared among two programs—collections and education. The Institute broadly serves CHF’s mission of treasuring the past, educating the present, and inspiring the future.

    While many organizations promote science or chemistry education, CHF is distinguished from them by basing outreach programs on its unparalleled collections of books and journals, archives, oral histories, artworks, instruments, and apparatuses. These collective resources constitute the material record of the human endeavor to investigate and shape nature through discovery and invention, a record that touches every aspect of life. Interpreting that record through a wide range of activities is the mission of the Institute. Through its outreach programs, the Institute conveys to a broad audience the excitement and implications of chemical innovation through time.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 12:21 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    December 14, 2006

    Dr. William Johnson, Vice Chairman of the Board for Technology, Liquidmetal Technologies, and Ruben and Donna Mettler Professor of Material Science, California Institute of Technology, 12-15-06


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    Dr. William Johnson is Vice Chairman of the Board for Technology for Liquidmetal Technologies. He directed the research that led to the discovery of Liquidmetal alloy.

    In addition to serving on the Liquidmetal Technologies Board, Dr. Johnson is the Ruben and Donna Mettler Professor of Material Science at Caltech. He received his BA in Physics from Hamilton College and his PhD in Applied Physics from Caltech. He spent two years at IBM's Research Center (1975-1977).

    Dr. Johnson held a Visiting Professor appointment at the Metal Physics Institute in Gottinghen, Germany (1983) and received a Von Humbolt Distinguished Scientist Fellowship in Gottingen (1988). He is the 1995 recipient of the TMS/AIME Hume Rothery Award for his experimental work. o

    Liquidmetal Technologies, a publicly traded company (OTC:LQMT), is a leading force in the research, development and commercialization of amorphous metals. The Company’s revolutionary class of patented Liquidmetal alloys and coatings form the basis of high performance materials that are utilized in a range of military, consumer and industrial products.

    Liquidmetal alloys were discovered by researchers at California Institute of Technology and are characterized as amorphous alloys that are two to three times stronger than commonly used titanium alloys, retain the malleability of plastic, and are relatively non-corrosive and wear-resistant. Not only do Liquidmetal alloys provide applications that were not possible before, but they also present new opportunities for the current and future designs of metallic based products. This revolutionary class of patented alloys and coatings may change the performance and cost paradigms for materials science.

    Liquidmetal Technologies principal executive offices and Corporate Technology Center are located in Lake Forest, CA.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 01:25 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 27, 2006

    Dr. William Carroll, American Chemical Society 2006 Immediate Past President, and Vice President, Chlorovinyl Issues, Occidental Chemical Corporation, 10-27-06


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    Dr. William F. Carroll, Jr. holds a B.A. in Chemistry and Physics from DePauw University, Greencastle, IN, an M.S. from Tulane University in New Orleans, and a Ph.D. from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, both in Organic Chemistry. He started his industry career in 1978 and after a year with Rohm and Haas Company, Bristol, PA, moved to what is now known as Occidental Chemical Corporation. He is currently Vice President, Chlorovinyl Issues for OxyChem and works on public policy issues and communications related to chlorine and PVC. He is also Adjunct Professor of Chemistry at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN and teaches polymer chemistry there.

    Dr. Carroll is Immediate Past President (2006) of the American Chemical Society, a member of the ACS Budget and Finance Committee, and past chair of its International Activities Committee. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a member of the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, and a member of the Science Advisory Board for DePauw University.

    Dr. Carroll has been an active member of and chaired various committees for a number of chemistry, plastics, fire protection and recycling organizations. He has served on expert groups commissioned by the United Nations Environmental Program, the State of Florida, and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. He received the Vinyl Institute’s Roy T. Gottesman Leadership Award for lifetime achievement in 2000.

    Dr. Carroll holds two patents, and has over 40 publications in the fields of organic electrochemistry, polymer chemistry, combustion chemistry and physics, incineration, plastics recycling and chlorine issues.

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a federally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry. ACS has a membership of more than 158,400 and a staff of 1900, with offices in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, OH.

    ACS advances knowledge and research through scholarly publishing, scientific conferences, information resources for education and business, and professional development efforts. The ACS also plays a leadership role in educating and communicating with public audiences—citizens, students, public leaders and others—about the important role that chemistry plays in identifying new solutions, improving public health, protecting the environment, and contributing to the economy.

    The Mission of the American Chemical Society is to

  • Advance the chemical sciences and technology

  • Communicate the value of chemistry and chemical engineering to the public

  • Support the chemical profession and its practitioners
  • Posted by David Lemberg at 07:38 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 18, 2006

    Dr. John Bahcall, Richard Black Professor Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, 2-23-05


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    Dr. John Bahcall (1934-2005) had a long and prolific career in astronomy and astrophysics, spanning five decades and the publication of more than 500 technical papers, books, and popular articles.

    Dr. Bahcall's original calculations of the expected neutrino output from the sun led to a long, experimental, and intellectual adventure that continues today. The "solar neutrino problem" has yielded new insights in astrophysics and into the most basic forces of nature. Dr. Bahcall led a major effort to exploit the capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope in elucidating the properties of quasars, and is recognized for his theoretical work in many different areas of astrophysics, including models of the Galaxy and studies of dark matter.

    Dr. Bahcall was Richard Black Professor Natural Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study. He joined the Institute in 1968. He was a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and Member of the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and NASA Advisory Council.

    Dr. Bahcall was the recipient of the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal (1992), National Medal of Science (1998), Hans Bethe Prize (1998), Dan David Prize (2003), Royal Astronomical Society Gold Medal (2003), Benjamin Franklin Medal (2003), Enrico Fermi Award (2003), and the Comstock Prize in Physics (2004).

    The Institute for Advanced Study is one of the world’s leading centers for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. The Institute exists to encourage and support fundamental scholarship—the original, often speculative, thinking that produces advances in knowledge. It provides for the mentoring of young scholars by senior Faculty, and offers the freedom to pursue work that will make significant contributions to a broad range of fields in the sciences and humanities. The Institute is a private, independent academic institution located on an 800-acre site in Princeton, NJ. It was founded in 1930 by philanthropists Louis Bamberger and his sister Caroline Bamberger Fuld, and through the vision of educator Abraham Flexner and the guidance of founding Trustees Samuel D. Leidesdorf and Herbert H. Maass.

    Work at the Institute takes place in four Schools: Historical Studies, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social Science. Esteemed past faculty have included Albert Einstein, who remained at the Institute until his death in 1955, and luminaries such as Kurt Gödel, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Erwin Panofsky, Homer A. Thompson, John von Neumann, and Hermann Weyl. Currently, a permanent Faculty of 26 eminent scholars guides the work of the Schools, and each year awards fellowships to some 190 visiting Members, from about 100 universities and research institutions throughout the world. The Institute’s more than 5000 former Members hold positions of intellectual and scientific leadership in the United States and abroad. More than a dozen Nobel laureates, and many more winners of the Wolf or MacArthur prizes, have been Institute Faculty or Members. Thirty-two out of 44 Fields Medalists have been Institute Faculty or Members.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:06 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    April 21, 2006

    Dr. Kim Griest, Professor of Physics, University of California, San Diego, 4/19/06


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    Dr. Kim Griest is Professor of Physics at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Griest trained originally in particle theory, studying supersymmetry, before turning to cosmology and the particles coming out of the first nanosecond of the Early Universe. These particles (weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs) may well be the mysterious dark matter that dominate the mass of the universe today and hold the galaxies together.

    In 1989, Dr. Griest started thinking about other kinds of dark matter, including black holes and small dim or dead stars, coining the term "MACHO" (massive astrophysical compact halo object) to describe them. After writing some theory papers on how to detect MACHOs via gravitational lensing, he joined a large collaboration (the MACHO collaboration) and led the analysis that eventually discovered gravitational microlensing and some evidence for this form of dark matter. Further work by the team eventually proved the majority of the dark matter cannot consist of MACHOs, thus leaving WIMPs as the primary suspect.

    Currently, Dr. Griest works on gravitational lensing, as well as dark energy, serving as chair of the Science Definition Team for the NASA/DoE Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM), and as a member of other NASA satellite mission teams. Dr. Griest has published over 150 scientific papers, is a fellow of the American Physical Society, and has won awards including an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, DoE Outstanding Junior Investigator, Cottrell Scholar, R&D 500, and Chancellor's Associate award for excellence in undergraduate teaching. Dr. Griest is also interested in energy policy, and is co-author of a petition by physicists against the new U.S. policy of first use of nuclear weapons against non-nuclear states.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 12:06 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    April 06, 2006

    Dr. Lisa Randall, Professor of Theoretical Physics, Harvard University, 4/5/06


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    Professor Lisa Randall's new book, Warped Passages: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe's Hidden Dimensions, was recently published by Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins. Warped Passages was included in The New York Times list of 100 notable books of 2005.

    Professor Randall’s research concerns the fundamental nature of particles and forces and how matter's basic elements relate to the physical properties of the world that we see. She has worked on a wide variety of ideas for what might lie beyond established particle physics and cosmological theories, including grand unified theories, supersymmetry, cosmological inflation, string theory, and most recently, extra dimensions of space.

    Professor Randall has made seminal contributions in all these areas, and as of Fall 2005 was the most cited theoretical physicist of the past five years. is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Physical Society. Professor Randall is a past winner of an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, a DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator Award, and the Westinghouse (now Intel) Science Talent Search.

    Professor Randall discusses how gravity is connected to the geometry of spacetime, potential solutions to the hierarchy problem utilizing a Gravitybrane model, the possibility of infinite extra dimensions, and possible outcomes of future experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (coming online at CERN in 2007).

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:55 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    March 04, 2006

    Dr. Lawrence Krauss, author of "The Physics of Star Trek" and Ambrose Swasey Professor of Physics and Professor of Astronomy at Case Western Reserve University, 2/22/06


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    Dr. Lawrence Krauss, Ambrose Swasey Professor of Physics and Professor of Astronomy at Case Western Reserve University. Professor Krauss is the author of over 200 scientific publications, as well as numerous popular articles on physics. He has written six popular books, including the international bestseller, The Physics of Star Trek. His latest book, Hiding in the Mirror: The Mysterious Allure of Extra Dimensions from Plato to String Theory and Beyond, was published in Fall 2005 by Viking.

    Professor Krauss has received numerous awards for his research, writing, and lecturing. These include include the Gravity Research Foundation First Prize Award (1984) and the Presidential Investigator Award (1986). In February 2000, in Washington D.C., he was awarded the American Association for the Advancement of Science's 1999-2000 Award for the Public Understanding of Science and Technology, joining previous awardees Carl Sagan (1995) and E.O.Wilson (1994).

    In April 2001, he received the Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize of the American Physical Society. The citation reads “For outstanding contributions to the understanding of the early universe, and extraordinary achievement in communicating the essence of physical science to the general public”. In April 2001 the American Institute of Physics announced that he had been awarded the 2001 Andrew Gemant Award, given annually to "a person who has made significant contributions to the cultural, artistic, or humanistic dimensions of physics". Previous awardees include Freeman Dyson, Steven Weinberg, and Stephen Hawking. In 2002 Professor Krauss was awarded the American Institute of Physics Science Writing Award, for his book, Atom.

    In 2003 Professor Krauss was awarded the Oersted Medal, the highest award of the American Association of Physics Teachers, for his contributions to the teaching of physics. Previous awardees include Richard Feynman, I.I. Rabi, Edward Purcell, and Hans Bethe.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 08:38 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    February 09, 2006

    Dr. Lisa Randall, Professor of Theoretical Physics, Harvard University, 2/8/06


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    Professor Lisa Randall's new book, Warped Passages: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe's Hidden Dimensions, was recently published by Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins. Warped Passages was included in The New York Times list of 100 notable books of 2005.

    Professor Randall’s research concerns the fundamental nature of particles and forces and how matter's basic elements relate to the physical properties of the world that we see. She has worked on a wide variety of ideas for what might lie beyond established particle physics and cosmological theories, including grand unified theories, supersymmetry, cosmological inflation, string theory, and most recently, extra dimensions of space.

    Professor Randall has made seminal contributions in all these areas, and as of Fall 2005 was the most cited theoretical physicist of the past five years. is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Physical Society. Professor Randall is a past winner of an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, a DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator Award, and the Westinghouse (now Intel) Science Talent Search.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 04:37 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    December 15, 2005

    Dr. Kevin Lesko, Senior Physicist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, and Mr. Dave Snyder, Executive Director, South Dakota Science and Technology Authority, 12/14/05


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    We continue our two-part conversation on South Dakota's Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory.

    Dr. Kevin T. Lesko is Senior Physicist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, and Spokesman, Homestake Collaboration, Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory(DUSEL). Dr. Lesko received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Washington. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and has received Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Outstanding Performance Award in 2003 and 2000.

    Dr. Lesko's research interests focus on neutrino physics. For the past 15 years he has dedicated most research efforts to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). SNO’s discovery of neutrino mass was the first compelling evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. With its unique sensitivity to both neutral-current and charged-current reactions and charged current spectral distortions, SNO provided irrefutable evidence for solar neutrino transformation. SNO also promises to contribute critical data to the neutrino-mixing matrix: going beyond the discovery phase to the precision measurement phase. As SNO has reached a stable operations mode, Dr. Lesko has expanded his research efforts to include significant contributions to the KamLAND experiment and to lead the national effort to establish a deep underground laboratory. He is currently investigating new technologies for low energy neutrino and double beta decay experiments.

    Dave Snyder is the Executive Director of the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority. He was named to the post by the Board of Directors effective November 15, 2004. He had been a member of the Board, having been appointed by Governor M. Michael Rounds in August 2004.

    The South Dakota Science and Technology Authority exists to foster and facilitate scientific and technological investigation, experimentation, and development. Created in February 2004 by the Legislature in response to Governor Rounds’ 2010 Initiative, the Authority is working to convert the closed Homestake Gold Mine in Lead, SD, into a science and engineering center, complete with a deep underground laboratory as well as education, visitor, and outreach components.

    The Homestake project has the potential to significantly advance the fundamental understanding of the physical universe, as well as to make a major positive impact on science, education, and economic development in South Dakota.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 04:00 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 02, 2005

    Dr. Sylvester James Gates, John S. Toll Professor of Physics and Director of the Center for String and Particle Theory, University of Maryland, 9/14/05


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    Dr. Sylvester James Gates is known for his skill at communicating the ideas at the frontiers of particle physics to general audiences. He explains how Albert Einstein's quest to find a "Unified Field Theory" seems to lead to superstring/M-theory, which describes infinitesimal vibrating structures that may encode all of physical reality. A celebrated scientist and teacher, Dr. Gates also is respected for his views on issues of general education in science and mathematics, the challenge of technical educations for African-Americans, and the issues of affirmative action and equity in science and society.

    Dr. Gates has published more than 100 scientific papers, co-authored one book, and contributed numerous articles in others. He has been profiled by newspapers such as the Washington Post and has provided commentary on scientific stories in the New York Times, Washington Post, and USA Today. Dr. Gates has appeared on three PBS scientific documentaries (most recently, "The Elegant Universe"), and will be seen in the broadcast of "Einstein's Big Idea" on PBS in October 2005. Dr. Gates is giving nearly 50 invited talks at national and international celebrations of the centennial of Einstein's "Miraculous Year", World Year of Physics 2005.

    Dr. Gates also is active in the international arena with respect to science, education, and development on the African continent and beyond. He holds an honorary appointment at Stellenbosch University in Cape Town and is a supporter of the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (AIMS). He gave the initial scientific lecture to the inaugural class at AIMS. Dr. Gates has advised the government of South Africa on the use of its national physics infrastructure and economic development, and participated in discussions in the nation of Mali concerning science, research, education, and development.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 02:41 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index