December 26, 2007

Dr. Ping Sheng, Head of the Department of Physics and Director of the Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 3-24-04


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Dr. Ping Sheng is Head of the Department of Physics and, previously, Director of the Institute of Nano Science and Technology at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He is also a Professor of Physics. Dr. Sheng is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and Member of the Asia Pacific Academy of Materials. In 2002, he was awarded Technology Leader of the Year by the Sing Tao Group. Dr. Sheng has published over 200 papers and presented over 100 keynote or invited talks at international meetings and conferences. He also has 10 U.S. patents and is the author of a monograph on Wave Scattering, Localization, and Mesoscopic Phenomena.
Dr. Sheng's research is in the area of condensed matter physics. He has pioneered in the study of liquid crystal–substrate interaction while at the RCA David Sarnoff Research Laboratory, and established the mechanisms of charging-energy correlated hopping and fluctuation-induced tunneling conduction in disordered materials. While at Exxon Corporate Research Center from 1979-1994, Dr. Sheng's interest broadened into wave interaction and scattering in disordered systems, and porous media. The study of nanotechnology became his main focus after joining HKUST in 1994, where he led efforts in the discovery of superconducting behavior in ultrathin carbon nanotubes, and the giant electrorheological effect in suspensions of nanoparticles. Dr. Sheng is the inventor of locally resonant sonic materials that can break the mass density law in shielding low frequency sound.
The Institute of Nano Science and Technology (INST), established in 2001 with Dr. Sheng as the founding Director, is the first such research institute in Hong Kong. Its mission is to carry out fundamental research and innovation in nanoscience and technology. Besides the accomplishments in carbon nanotubes and electrorheological fluids, which were reported worldwide in the Washington Post, New Scientist, Science Now, Nanotechweb, and PhysicsWeb, INST achievements include the discovery of room temperature UV lasing from zinc oxide nanocrystals, the discovery of the giant Hall effect in granular metal films, and commercialization of the visible-blind UV detector based on semiconductor heterostructures.

Posted by David Lemberg at 02:29 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

August 09, 2007

Dr. Eric Isaacs, Director, Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory, and Professor of Physics, James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, 8-9-07


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Dr. Eric D. Isaacs is the Director of the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory and Professor of Physics in the James Franck Institute at the University of Chicago. He received his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1988 in the area of magnetic semiconductors and was a post-doc at Bell Laboratories (1988-1990) studying magnetism and superconductivity, mostly with synchrotron-based x-ray techniques. During his 13-year tenure at Bell Laboratories he was a Member of Technical Staff (1990-2000), Director of the Materials Physics Research Department (2000-2001), and Director of the Semiconductor Physics Department (2001-2003).

Dr. Isaacs has served on numerous national review and advisory committees including the APS Division of Materials Physics (2002-2005) and the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (2002 - present). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society (2001).

Dr. Isaacs’s current research centers on studies of novel electronic and magnetic materials with a particular focus on creating images of new phenomena in reciprocal and real space at the nanoscale. Recent accomplishments include the direct observation of the cross-over to quantum dominated spin dynamics near a quantum critical point in the model magnetic system chromium. In order to achieve many of his results he has been a developer of modern synchrotron-based x-ray scattering techniques including inelastic x-ray scattering, x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, and hard x-ray nano-probe.

The Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory is a national resource for the United States to foster new research capabilities in nanoscale synthesis and processing, and plays a key role in the U.S. Department of Energy’s participation in the interagency National Nanotechnology Initiative. The center’s mission includes supporting basic research and advanced instrumentation development for the creation of novel materials, using both top-down and bottom-up self-assembly, that provide new insights at the nanoscale level. The facility also supports a user program through peer-reviewed proposals that is open to academic, industrial, government, and international potential users.

Areas of expertise include Electronic and magnetic materials and devices

  • Nanobio interfaces

  • Nanofabrication

  • Nanophotonics

  • X-ray microscopy
  • Posted by David Lemberg at 05:24 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    April 12, 2007

    Dr. Jo Anne Shatkin, Principal,The Cadmus Group, 4-12-07


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    Jo Anne Shatkin, Ph.D., is a Principal of The Cadmus Group, an international firm that provides environmental, water and energy consulting services to government and private clients. She is a recognized expert in environmental aspects of nanotechnology, human health risk assessment and technical communications, and manages Cadmus’ human health risk assessment and nanotechnology practice. She is presently leading Cadmus’ efforts to support the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Planning for Nanotechnology Research.

    Dr. Shatkin has 18 years of experience in research and application of quantitative human health risk assessment managing over 70 environmental risk assessments under a variety of US federal, state, and voluntary programs. Her areas of expertise include environmental chemistry, assessing chemical bioavailability, and providing technical support for advisory and stakeholder outreach and communication.

    Dr. Shaktin received her Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Policy in 1994 and her MA in Risk Management and Technology Assessment, both from Clark University, Worcester, MA. She is a research fellow of the George Perkins Marsh Institute at Clark University.

    Dr. Shatkin has been an active member of the Society for Risk Analysis since 1989, and recently founded the Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group of the Society for Risk Analysis.

    Founded in 1983, employee-owned The Cadmus Group helps government, nonprofit, and corporate clients address critical challenges in the environmental and energy sectors. Cadmus provides an array of research and analytical services in the United States and abroad, specializing in solving complex problems that demand innovative, multidisciplinary thinking. Among Cadmus’ major practice areas are Drinking Water and Water Quality, Communications and Social Marketing, Energy Services (including energy efficiency and renewable energy), Risk Assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment and Environmentally Sound Design, and Environmental Management.

    The Cadmus staff includes scientists; engineers; statisticians; economists; MBAs; marketing, public relations, and communications professionals; attorneys; information technology specialists; and public policy analysts. Many of our senior consultants are nationally recognized experts in their fields and several serve on high-level U.S. government science advisory boards.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 07:43 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    March 08, 2007

    Dr. Nathan Cady, Assistant Professor of Nanobioscience, The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University of Albany, Albany, NY, 3-8-07


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    One of Dr. Nathan Cady's key areas of research is developing methods to study biological processes at the nano- and microscale. This involves development of microfluidic biosensors and novel detection technologies. He is currently extending his previous work with nucleic-acid based biosensors by researching the development of sensors that are capable of detecting multiple organisms and/or DNA sequences within single samples. This type of multiplex analysis is relevant for clinical diagnostic purposes, genetic analysis, and detection of biowarfare agents. To develop these multiplex systems, Dr. Cady is exploring new optical and electrical detection strategies, including the use of quantum dots and organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs).

    Beyond his research in biosensor technology, Dr. Cady is focusing on broader nanobiotechnology research. He is particularly interested in how cells interact with their environment at the nanoscale, especially how they adhere to, move along, and penetrate different surfaces. One of the more difficult conditions to control when studying cell-surface interactions is the large variability of the surfaces and environments that are used.

    By better understanding how cells interact with these defined, nanoscale environments, Dr. Cady plans to provide insight for bioengineering applications such as materials biocompatibility, prosthetics and medical device design. This research effort will also address fundamental properties of how microorganisms, especially pathogenic bacteria, interact with surfaces to cause disease. To date there have been relatively few research groups using nanotechnology to answer these questions, making this an exciting and challenging field for new exploration.

    Dr. Cady reeived his Ph.D. in Microbiology and B.A. in Biology from Cornel University (2005 and 1999, respectively).

    The University of Albany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering is the first college in the world dedicated to research, development, education, and deployment in the emerging disciplines of nanoscience, nanoengineering, nanobioscience, and nanoeconomics. In May 2006, it was ranked as the nation’s number one college for nanotechnology and microtechnology in the Annual College Ranking by Small Times magazine. CNSE’s Albany NanoTech complex is the most advanced research facility of its kind at any university in the world - a $3.5 billion, 450,000-square-foot complex that attracts corporate partners from around the world and offers students a one-of-a-kind academic experience.

    The UAlbany NanoCollege houses the only fully integrated, 300mm wafer, computer chip pilot prototyping and demonstration line within 65,000 square feet of Class 1 capable cleanrooms. Over 1600 scientists, researchers, engineers, students, and faculty work on site at CNSE’s Albany NanoTech complex, including IBM, AMD, SONY, Toshiba, Qimonda, Honeywell, ASML, Applied Materials, Tokyo Electron, and Freescale. An expansion currently underway will increase the size of CNSE’s Albany NanoTech complex to over 750,000 square feet, including over 80,000 square feet of Class 1 cleanroom space, to house over 2000 scientists, researchers, engineers, students, and faculty by the end of 2008.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 12:36 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    March 01, 2007

    Richard Garozzo, Senior Composites Engineer in the Polymer Nanocomposites and Composites Group, University of Dayton Research Institute, and Manager, UDRI’s Center for Multifunctional Polymer Nanocomposites and Devices, 3-1-07


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    Richard Garozzo is a Senior Composites Engineer in the Polymer Nanocomposites and Composites Group at the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), as well as Manager of UDRI’s Center for Multifunctional Polymer Nanocomposites and Devices (CMPND). He has more than 20 years experience performing research and development in advanced composite materials, including process development and characterization of advanced composite materials and carbon-carbon systems, as well as tooling development.

    Mr. Garozzo has extensive experience in numerous forms of composite and plastic processing and in composite reinforcements and matrix systems. He is also well versed in plastics and rubber molding materials, and in developing parts for man-rated programs for the aerospace, medical and automotive industries. Earlier in his career, Mr. Garozzo was President and CEO of P&R Wheel and Water Sports, a multimillion dollar dealership for sales and service of composite vessels. He received his master of science degree in nonmetallic material science from California State University in 1978.

    The University of Dayton Research Institute’s Center for Multifunctional Polymer Nanocomposites and Devices (CMPND) is the world’s first manufacturing center for product demonstration of nano-enhanced polymer composites. Created in collaboration with the National Composite Center in Dayton, OH, where it is located, the facility gives manufacturers the opportunity to evaluate state-of-the-art materials in their composite products, but without the major investment dollars and risk involved in purchasing new equipment and retooling their facilities.

    The CMPND facility features a 10-foot autoclave, a 440-ton injection molding machine, a laser profiler and other equipment, in addition to lab and office space, and services include materials testing, prototype development and small production runs.

    Manufacturers have access to the facility and its technologies, as well as UDRI staff expertise in nanomaterials. UDRI can also help manufacturers reduce the transition time of new materials to the marketplace.

    UDRI’s CMPND is part of a larger program for the development of polymer nanomaterials and devices funded by Ohio’s Third Frontier Project. Other partners in the umbrella program are Ohio State University, working in the area of biosensors, and the University of Akron, working in polymer photonics.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 08:22 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    December 18, 2006

    Dr. Kristen Kulinowski, Director, International Council on Nanotechnology, and Executive Director for Education and Public Policy, Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, Rice University, 5-3-06


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    The Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology at Rice University aims to shape nanoscience into a discipline with the relevance, triumphs, and vitality of a modern-day polymer science. Dr. Kristen Kulinowshi has studied how material structured on the nanometer length scale can be used to manipulate light through the creation of a "photonic band gap". She worked in the D.C. office of a member of the U.S. House of Representatives on issues such as weapons of mass destruction, antiterrorism legislation, and domestic nuclear power security.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 11:15 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    Dr. Anand Gadre, Assistant Professor, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University of Albany–SUNY, 4-19-06


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    At the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Dr. Anand Gadre’s research centers around micro-electro-mechanical Systems, including novel process integration techniques for polymeric BioMEMS and bionanotechnology. His research interests also focus on biomedical applications such as development of noninvasive nanoscale sensors and drug delivery systems and cell transfection microdevices. Dr. Gadre’s group also focuses on conducting polymers, in particular the synthesis of conducting/insulating polymeric composite films and nanofibers,and the application of these polymeric composites as chemical and biological sensors, polymeric LED, and polymeric rechargeable batteries.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 10:50 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    Dr. Scott Huxtable, Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, 4-12-06


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    Dr. Scott Huxtable leads the Nanoscale Energy Transport Laboratory where he and his students examine a variety of topics related to the flow of energy at the molecular level. They are interested in understanding the fundamental physics that control nanoscale energy transport as well as developing devices that are based on the underlying physics. Dr. Huxtable and his team are developing a variety of thermoelectric systems including coolers, power generators, and heat flux sensors.

    In January 2006, Dr. Huxtable was awarded a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) Award, which is the National Science Foundation's most prestigious award for creative junior faculty. This five-year grant will support some of Dr. Huxtable’s nanoscale thermal transport studies, the creation of a new “Nanoengineering” class at Virginia Tech, and a summer program to introduce engineering to underrepresented minority high school students.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 10:48 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    November 09, 2006

    Mark Modzelewski, Vice President of Strategic Opportunities, NanoDynamics, 11-10-06


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    Mark Modzelewski joined NanoDynamics in May 2005 as Vice President of Strategic Opportunities. In 2004, he co-founded Lux Research, a research and advisory firm focusing on nanotechnology. In 2003, he founded The Benet Group, a private equity firm focused on developing early stage, bio-nanotechnology companies. In 2001, he founded the NanoBusiness Alliance, the first nanotechnology trade association, and continues to serve as its Executive Chairman. Prior to the formation of the Alliance, Mr. Modzelewski served as Vice President, Business Development for Opion, a surveillance and marketing technology company.

    Mr. Modzelewski is currently a member of the Nanotechnology Technical Advisory Group to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and previously served as a special assistant to Secretary Cisneros (HUD) and Secretary Glickman (USDA) during the Clinton administration. He is a graduate of Boston University and received a J.D. from the University of Denver College of Law.

    NanoDynamics, headquartered in Buffalo, NY, is a fully integrated technology and manufacturing company utilizing nanoscale engineering and materials to address some of the world's biggest challenges. The company's research and business units, including ND Innovations, ND Materials, ND Products, MetaMateria Partners and ND Life Sciences, provide nano-enabled solutions in the fields of energy, automotive, water processing, life sciences, electronics, advanced materials and consumer products.

    NanoDynamics believes the future applications of nanotechnology will rely heavily on the commercial development of nanomaterials — metals, ceramics, and composite materials that are produced at the nanoscale, but which are ultimately available in commercial volumes and at affordable prices. NanoDynamics has established true commercial operations in a 40,000 square foot facility in Buffalo, NY, where scale-up and volume manufacturing of these new materials can be accomplished in a reliable and economical fashion.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 08:20 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 06, 2006

    Dr. Gary Fedder, Howard M. Wilkoff Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director, Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University, 10-6-06


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    Dr. Gary Fedder is Howard M. Wilkoff Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the new Director of the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems at Carnegie Mellon University. Professor Gary Fedder’s research interests are in the multidisciplinary area of microelectromechanical systems, and focus primarily on design, fabrication, and control aspects of sensor- and actuator-based systems. In MEMS, micron- to millimeter-size systems with sophisticated abilities to interact with their environment are manufactured through the use of VLSI-based photolithographic batch fabrication methods.

    Professor Fedder's group is designing a variety of MEMS, including microaccelerometers, gyroscopes, resonant sensors, and x-y-z microservos, using a unique process that combines foundry CMOS with thin film microstructures. Research in MEMS computer-aided design aims to develop structured design tools and a top-down synthesis flow. Continuing research will study control of large systems of microsensors and actuators, and broaden the manufacturing capabilities of integrated MEMS.

    Professor Fedder received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in EECS from MIT in 1982 and 1984, respectively. From 1984 to 1989, he worked at the Hewlett-Packard Company on a VLSI integrated-circuit test system and on modeling of printed-circuit-board interconnect for high-speed computers. In 1994, he received the Ph.D. degree in EECS from the University of California at Berkeley, where his research resulted in the first demonstration of multimode control of an underdamped surface-micromachined inertial device. He received the 1993 AIME Electronic Materials Society Ross Tucker Award, the 1996 Carnegie Institute of Technology G.T. Ladd Award, and the 1996 NSF CARRER Award.

    Currently, Professor Fedder serves as a subject editor for the IEEE/ASME Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, and on the editorial board of the IoP Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. He served as general co-chair of the 2005 IEEE MEMS Conference. Professor Fedder has contributed to over 100 research publications and several patents in the MEMS area.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 08:52 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    September 26, 2006

    Dr. John Fourkas, Millard Alexander Professor of Chemistry, University of Maryland, 6/21/06


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    Dr. John Fourkas is the Millard Alexander Professor of Chemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park, and is also a member of the Institute for Physical Science and Technology at UMD and the Maryland Center for Integrated Nano Science and Engineering. His training was in the application of lasers to understand chemistry in liquids. Professor Fourkas continues to work in this field, and his research has expanded to include applications of lasers in areas such as micro- and nanotechnology, microscopy, and high-density data storage. A major focus of his current research efforts is the use of lasers to fabricate three-dimensional micromachines.

    Professor Fourkas has published more than 100 papers and has co-edited three books. His research has been covered in venues that include Discover, Popular Science, and New Scientist. He is a Senior Editor of the Journal of Physical Chemistry.

    Professor Fourkas is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His accomplishments in research and education have been recognized with awards that include Beckman Young Investigator, Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar, Sloan Research Fellow, and Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:42 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    September 23, 2006

    Dr. Michael Wong, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Rice University, 9/22/06


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    Dr. Michael S. Wong is Assistant Professor of both Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at Rice University in Houston, TX. His research in nanostructured materials is at the cutting edge of chemistry and is extending the traditional boundaries of both chemical engineering and materials science. He has used nanoparticles to develop innovative new catalysts for the chemical industry, a new class of microcapsule for biomedical applications, and palladium-coated gold nanoparticles for the environmental remediation of water contaminated by chlorinated compounds like TCE.

    Dr. Wong's research has been featured in Scientific American, New Scientist, and Science News. Technology Review magazine recently named him to its coveted TR35 list — a compilation of the world's top 35 innovators under the age of 35.

    Dr. Wong earned his bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from Caltech, and his master's and doctoral degrees from MIT. He did his postdoctoral research at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and joined Rice's faculty in 2001.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 10:29 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    July 17, 2006

    Dr. Naomi Halas, Stanley C. Moore Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Director, Laboratory for Nanophotonics, and Professor of Chemistry, Rice University, 7/12/06


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    Dr. Naomi Halas is the Stanley C. Moore Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Director of the Laboratory for Nanophotonics, and Professor of Chemistry at Rice University. She is best known as the inventor of nanoshells, a new class of multi-layered nanoscale particles that have unique optical properties of wide interest in optics, biomedicine, materials science, and other disciplines. In creating nanoshells, Dr. Halas drew upon her education and training in both the natural and applied sciences.

    Dr. Halas joined the faculty of Rice's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in 1989 and received a joint appointment in the Department of Chemistry in 1999. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a recipient of the National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, and a four-time winner of the Rice Engineering Alumni's Hershel M. Rich Invention Award. Dr. Halas was recently named Fellow of the American Physical Society, and she received the "Cancer Innovator" Award from the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs of the U. S. Department of Defense in 2003.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:03 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    June 16, 2006

    Dr. Michael Mackay, Professor of Chemical Engineering, and Adjunct Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 6/14/06


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    Professor Michael E. Mackay is Professor of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, and Adjunct Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University. He received his undergraduate degree in chemical engineering with distinction from the University of Delaware in 1979. He received an M.S. in 1983 and a Ph.D. in 1985 at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Following his Ph.D. he joined the chemical engineering staff at the University of Melbourne (Australia) as a University of Melbourne Postdoctoral Fellow. He was a staff member in the Chemical Engineering Department at The University of Queensland (Australia) from 1987 until 1998. From 1999 through mid-2001 he was a professor at Stevens Institute of Technology.

    Professor Mackay joined the faculty at Michigan State University in mid-2001 where he is performing research in the area of nanotechnology and its application to plastic materials. His most recent work has been published in Science and Nature Materials where very unusual phenomena have been discovered when nanoparticles are added to polymers or plastics.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:40 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    May 11, 2006

    Dr. James Tour, Chao Professor of Chemistry at Rice University's Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, and Director, Rice University Carbon Nanotechnology Laboratory, 5/10/06


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    Dr. James Tour is the Chao Professor of Chemistry at Rice University’s Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology. Dr. Tour is the director of Rice’s Carbon Nanotechnology Laboratory, and he holds appointments in Rice’s departments of chemistry, computer science, and mechanical engineering and materials science.

    Dr. Tour is a synthetic organic chemist. His research comprises three main areas: molecular computing, bottom-up molecular nanofabrication, and carbon nanotube growth and modifications for composites. Dr. Tour holds 20 U.S. patents and has published more than 270 research papers.

    Dr. Tour’s first paper on single-molecule nanocars, published October 2005 in the journal, Nano Letters, was the most-accessed article from any American Chemical Society journal for all of 2005.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 10:48 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    March 17, 2006

    Jim Hurd, Founder and Director, NanoScience Exchange, 3/15/06


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    Jim Hurd is the Founder and Director of the NanoScience Exchange, which was founded in early 2002. The organization examines key business and policy issues that affect venture-backed nanotechnology-related start-ups. The NanoScience Exchange hosts regular events in Silicon Valley and Washington, D.C. on topics such as “Applications to Combat Biogical and Chemical Weapons”, “Renewable Energy Applications Changing the U.S. Landscape”, “Navigating the Funding Maze in Washington, D.C.”, and “Nano Materials: Real Revenues Today and Impact on the U.S. Economy”.

    On February 17, 2006, in Washington, D.C., the NanoScience Exchange presented “Nanotech Patents and Environmental Policy: A Threat to Economic Viability of Nanotech Companies?”

    Mr. Hurd also heads the consulting firm, Molecular Business, located in San Francisco, which since December 2001 has assisted leading nanotechnology start-ups in building strategic alliances with major corporations and in putting together rounds of investment. He works with Natural Nano and other companies on developing key strategic relationships and increasing company visibility.

    Mr. Hurd worked with the Woodrow Wilson International Center in 2005 on an EPA-related project. He authored a chapter, “Converging Technologies in Developing Countries” for a National Science Foundation book released in Fall 2005.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 07:47 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    February 14, 2006

    Jack Uldrich, President, The NanoVeritas Group, 2/8/06


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    Jack Uldrich is the author of four books, including the award-winning, bestseller, The Next Big Thing is Really Small: How Nanotechnology Will Change the Future of Your Business; Into the Unknown: Leadership Lessons from Lewis & Clark’s Daring Westward Adventure; Soldier, Statesman, Peacemaker: Leadership Lessons from George C. Marshall, and most recently, Investing in Nanotechnology: Think Small, Win Big. He is the president of The NanoVeritas Group—an international leadership and technology consultancy dedicated to helping business, government, and non-profit organizations prepare for and profit from the emerging field of nanotechnology. Clients include Fortune 100 companies, venture capital firms, and state and regional governments.

    Mr. Uldrich is a regular contributor on nanotechnology for The Motley Fool, and his articles have also appeared in The Wall Street Reporter: Leader to Leader, The Futurist, The Scientist, CityBusiness, The Futures Research Quarterly, TechStation Central, and scores of other newspapers around the country.

    Mr. Uldrich is a frequent speaker on the nanotechnology lecture circuit and has addressed numerous businesses, trade associations, and investment groups, including General Mills, Pfizer, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Also, he is a regular guest on CNBC and CNN. Mr. Uldrich, a former naval intelligence officer and Defense Department official, served as the Director of the Minnesota Office of Strategic and Long Range Planning under Governor Jesse Ventura.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 10:58 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    January 22, 2006

    Professor Qimiao Si, Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, and Professor Doug Natelson, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 1/18/06


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    Professor Qimiao Si works in the field of theoretical condensed matter physics. His major contributions have been in the area of strongly correlated electron systems, including magnetic heavy fermion metals, high temperature superconductors, and mesoscopic and disordered electronic systems. He is particularly well known for his theory of quantum criticality.

    Professor Si was named a Sloan Research Fellow of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in 1996, and received a Cottrell Scholar Award from the Research Corporation in 1998. He is a Fellow of the U.K.'s Institute of Physics (since 2004) and a Fellow of the American Physical Society (since 2005). He has published more than 70 scientific articles and has given over 140 invited talks on his research. He serves on the Advisory Editorial Board of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. He will be organizing the 2007 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems, the 16th of a flagship annual conference series in this area, in Houston.

    Professor Doug Natelson is a condensed matter experimentalist, with research interests largely focused on electronic and magnetic investigations of nanostructured systems. Research efforts in his lab include quantum effects in metal and semiconductor nanostructures, organic semiconductor devices, and single-molecule electronics.

    Professor Natelson received the Research Corporation's Research Innovation Award in 2001, was awarded a Packard Fellowship in 2003, and an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation research fellowship and an NSF CAREER award the following year. He has published more than 30 scientific articles, and has given more than 50 invited presentations of his research.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 03:09 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    January 14, 2006

    Dr. Jeremy Ramsden, Chair of Nanotechnology, Cranfield University, 1/11/06


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    Dr. Jeremy Ramsden was apppinted to the Chair of Nanotechnology at Cranfield University in 2002. . His current research interests include hybrid living/nonliving devices, integrated optics for sensing and actuation, and self-assembly and complex adaptive materials.

    In 2003 he was appointed Research Director for Nanobiotechnology at Cranfield University at Kitakyushu, where he leads work on fiberoptic probes for medical and environmental applications. In 2005 he became Editor-in-Chief of the newly launched periodical Nanotechnology Perceptions, which aims to become a globally leading forum for debate and technical analysis of all aspects of nanotechnology and ultraprecision engineering.

    Dr. Ramsden has published over 120 papers in these areas, and is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Biological Physics and Chemistry.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 11:27 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    December 09, 2005

    Dr. Jorge Rodriguez, 2004 National Science Foundation CAREER Award recipient, and Assistant Professor of Physics, Purdue Univeresity, 11/30/05


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    Dr. Jorge H. Rodriguez is a prominent researcher in the field of biomolecular physics. In particular, he is a leading authority in the physico-chemical properties of iron-containing proteins such as the oxygen-transporting hemoglobin in mammals and hemerythrin in marine invertebrates. Dr. Rodriguez takes an interdisciplinary approach to science by applying the rigorous concepts of quantum mechanics and other fundamental principles of physics to study metalloproteins, metalloenzymes, and other biomolecules.

    In 2004 Dr. Rodriguez received a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation. This award fosters Dr. Rodriguez's computational research on biomolecular physics and, in particular, on quantum models of the electronic structure and biological function of magnetically ordered metalloproteins. According to NSF, the CAREER is its "most prestigious award for new faculty members. The CAREER program recognizes and supports the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who are most likely to become the academic leaders of the 21st century."

    Dr. Rodriguez and his team at Purdue University have been studying the relationship between the electronic configurations and the function of important metal-containing proteins and enzymes. This requires using sophisticated computational methods to solve the basic equations of quantum mechanics to describe the behavior of valence electronic shells in active sites of metalloproteins. As a result, Dr. Rodriguez and his group are obtaining a detailed quantitative understanding of the physico-chemical mechanisms that govern the behavior of proteins and other biomolecules. This in turn paves the way for transforming molecular biology and biochemistry into predictive quantitative subjects rather than descriptive ones

    Posted by David Lemberg at 03:27 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    November 12, 2005

    Dr. Carlo D. Montemagno, Chairman, Department of Bioengineering; Carol and Roy Doumani Professor of Biomedical Engineering; and Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, 11/9/05


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    Nanotechnology, hybrid living-nonliving systems, artificial neurons, robust defect-tolerant systems.

    Dr. Carlo Montemagno's research is focused on the application of nanotechnology to biological systems. He is well known for having engineered and fabricated the first nanobiomechanical motor system. Dr. Montemagno has published over 60 papers, holds several patents, and has presented over 45 keynote or invited talks at international conferences. For his cumulative work, Dr. Montemagno was awarded the Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology in 2003.

    Dr. Montemagno's current research projects are directed at the development of biomolecular motor–powered nanoelectromechanical devices, muscle-powered MEMS devices, microrobotics, and the engineering of on-chip detectors for pathogens. In addition to his academic accomplishments, Dr. Montemagno has provided extensive services to professional societies around the world. He is a member of many national scientific committees, has provided guidance to other governments on the development of NEMS technologies, and chaired or served on numerous organizing committees of international conferences on emerging technology.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 11:31 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 20, 2005

    Dr. Billy J. Stanbery, President and CEO, HelioVolt Corporation, 8/24/05


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    Dr. Billy J. Stanbery founded HelioVolt Corporation in order to develop and market new technology for applying thin-film photovoltaic coatings to conventional construction materials. He invented the company's FAAST (TM) process, a low-cost, flexible manufacturing process for CIGS synthesis.

    Dr. Billy J. Stanbery's early work in photovoltaics began in 1978, as a Senior Microelectronics Engineer with the Electronics Support Division of the Boeing Aerospace Company. His initial responsibility was the development of fabrication processes for very high power silicon concentrator solar cells for a Boeing IR&D program in 1978. Based on that work, he negotiated a contract with Sandia National Laboratories for further development of the technology in 1980, and was responsible during the contract period for the design and operation of an advanced computer controlled concentrator solar cell test facility.

    Subsequent to the work on concentrator cells, Dr. Stanbery served as a consultant at Boeing on an Air Force SMATH V subcontract for the development of metallization systems and device configurations for fabricating silicon solar cells capable of withstanding high temperature heat treatment. Since 1982, he has participated in Boeing's development of large-area CuInSe2 solar cells and related photovoltaic devices, has published over two dozen papers, and holds seven U.S. patents in photovoltaic technology.

    In 1988, Dr. Stanbery was named Senior Principal Engineer at Boeing, managing the company's terrestrial photovoltaic program, including three contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). His team set what was at the time the record for CIGS thin-film efficiency (14.6% AM1.5G). In 1990, a team lead by Dr. Stanbery demonstrated a tandem GaAs/CuInSe cell (measured at 25.8% AM1.5G), which still holds the world-record for thin-film solar cell efficiency.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 01:19 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 10, 2005

    Dr. James Dye, University Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Michigan State University, 9/7/05


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    Dr. James Dye's illustrious career is an extensive one. In the past 20 years alone, he has produced 91 research papers in chemistry, published in various journals including Science, Nature, and Journal of the American Chemical Society. His work has warranted coverage in The New York Times and numerous other newspapers and publications. During this same period, his research group received more than $3.3 million in research funds from the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research.


    Dr. Dye is the only chemist in Michigan awarded membership in the National Academy of Sciences, and was until recently the only MSU professor in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. At age 70, he received the highest award given for Inorganic Chemistry in the U.S., the American Chemical Society National Award in Inorganic Chemistry.

    Dr. Dye's work with Columbia doctoral student Michael Lefenfeld led to the formation of SiGNa Chemistry, an early-stage company developing unique solutions to compelling chemistry problems. The company's nano-encapsulated alkali materials are currently used in academia, and industrial markets as diverse as pharmaceutical synthesis, petroleum refining, organometallics, catalysis, and hydrogen energy.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 02:31 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    October 05, 2005

    Dr. Jay Johnson, Group Leader, Chemical and Biological Sensors, Materials Engineering Division, University of Dayton Research Institute, 9/14/05


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    Dr. Jay Johnson has spent over 25 years in industry working on various aspects of chemical and biological sensor–related R&D and in R&D Management. Dr. Johnson joined UDRI in 2000 as a research chemist, then was promoted to senior research scientist in charge of the Institute's sensors laboratory. He is also an Assistant Professor in the University of Dayton School of Chemical Engineering. Dr. Johnson's research and professional interests are in chemical and biological sensors, biotechnological and biomedical applications of sensors, redox monitoring and control of biochemical systems, bioelectrochemistry, biocatalysis, photochemistry, and photobiology.

    Dr. Johnson received his master's and doctoral degrees in analytical and biochemistry at Wright State University and the University of Cincinnati, respectively. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and has co-authored a number of publications in his areas of research. Dr. Johnson is also the sole inventor on five U.S. patents and co-inventor on two additional patents.

    The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) is a national leader in scientific and engineering research, serving government, industry, and nonprofit customers. UDRI's professional engineers and scientists conduct research and provide support in a wide variety of technical areas, ensuring customer success by delivering affordable and innovative solutions, leading edge technologies, and outstanding service. Major research areas include aerospace and automotive industries, materials and processes, manufacturing technology, environmental sciences, engineering, and information technology. UDRI also contributes to the fulfillment of the University's commitments to education, research, and public service through the involvement of students, faculty, and external partners.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 09:59 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    September 18, 2005

    Dr. Carlo Montemagno, 2003 Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology recipient and Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, 3/24/04


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    Dr. Carlo Montemagno is the Carol and Roy Doumani Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Chairman of Academic Affairs for UCLA's Biomedical Engineering IDP, and a Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. In 1988, Dr. Montemagno joined Argonne National Laboratory, where he both developed and served as group leader for the Advanced Environmental Studies and Environmental Physics research groups. While at Argonne National Laboratory, Dr. Montemagno earned his doctorate at the University of Notre Dame in Civil Engineering in 1995. Joining UCLA in 2001, he has published over 60 papers, holds several patents, and has presented over 45 keynote or invited talks at international conferences. For his cumulative work, Dr. Montemagno was awarded the Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology in 2003.

    Dr. Montemagno's research is focused on the application of nanotechnology to biological systems. He is well known for having engineered and fabricated the first nanobiomechanical motor system. This effort named him a Finalist in Discovery Magazine’s Technological Innovations of the Year in the field of Emergent Technology. His current research projects are directed at the development of biomolecular motor–powered nanoelectromechanical devices, muscle-powered MEMS devices, microrobotics, and the engineering of on-chip detectors for pathogens. In addition to his academic accomplishments, Dr. Montemagno has provided extensive services to professional societies around the world. He is a member of many national scientific committees, has provided guidance to other governments on the development of NEMS technologies, and chaired or served on numerous organizing committees of international conferences on emerging technology.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 01:50 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    September 01, 2005

    Dr. Pradeep Haldar, Director, Energy and Environmental Applications Center, Albany NanoTech, 8/10/05


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    Dr. Pradeep Haldar is Director of the Energy & Environmental Technology Applications Center at Albany NanoTech and a Professor at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University of Albany–State University of New York. He is responsible for technology development initiatives and for assisting companies to overcome technical, market, and business development barriers by accelerating the insertion of nanotechnology into energy and environmental applications.

    Dr. Haldar is the author or co-author of over 100 technical papers and has three patents in superconductor oxide materials development. Dr. Haldar has a Ph.D. in Materials Science from Northeastern University and an MBA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

    One of the largest global centers for nanotechnology, Albany NanoTech is home to the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and the New York State Center of Excellence in Nanoelectronics (NYSCEN) of the University at Albany–State University of New York. Its 450,000 square foot complex, including the only 200mm/300mm wafer facilities in the academic world, encompasses nanoelectronics, system-on-a-chip technologies, biochips, optoelectronics and photonics devices, closed-loop sensors for monitoring, detection and protection, and ultra-high-speed communication components.

    With over 65,000 square feet of Class 1 capable 300mm wafer cleanrooms, as well as on-site faculty and student researchers, Albany NanoTech provides corporate partners with a unique environment to pioneer, develop, and test new nanoscience and nanoengineering innovations within a technically aggressive and financially competitive R&D environment.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 06:19 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    August 23, 2005

    Dr. Enrique Barrera, Professor and Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Rice University, 8/3/05


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    Dr. Enrique V. Barrera is Professor and Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Rice University. Dr. Barrera is a recipient of the 2002 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring, which he received in a White House ceremony in March 2003. In 2004 he was selected as a Fellow of the American Society of Materials.

    Dr. Barrera’s research focus is on the processing and development of nanocomposite/hybrids and nanotube systems. He has initiated the Outreach with Mexico Program and the Materials Technology Consortium, and he is a Cluster Leader for the Rice NSF Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate program. Dr. Barrera has published 120 journal papers and has nine patents submitted in nanomaterials development.

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Rice University is a strong engineering department. Members of the faculty hold over 100 teaching awards and have a similar number of patents. The department has core faculty in Computational Fluids, Nanomaterials, Solid Mechanics, and Robotics and Megatronics. The faculty are heavily funded by NSF, DOD, NASA, and many other generous sources.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 04:45 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    August 13, 2005

    Neil Gordon, President, Canadian NanoBusiness Alliance, 7/27/05


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    Neil Gordon is President of the Canadian NanoBusiness Alliance and specializes in nanotechnology commercialization and global initiatives. He is heading the establishment of a nanofabrication center that will be offering prototyping services and low volume production for nanoscale devices that make use of low cost polymer substrates instead of silicon, such as biosensors, lab-on-a-chip, solar panels, and OLED displays. As a nanotechnology business consultant, he has worked with various government agencies, investors, start-ups, and business units in large companies throughout the world in diverse industries.

    Mr. Gordon also heads the commercialization initiative of CANEUS, a NASA-led effort between multiple government agencies in the U.S. and allied countries and the private sector, to develop standards, prototypes, and collaborative investments in Micro and Nano Technologies (MNTs) for aerospace and defense applications.

    The Canadian NanoBusiness Alliance (CNBA) is involved in developing major nanotechnology initiatives throughout the world. With an extensive network of nanotechnology leaders in business, science, finance, and politics, CNBA offers leadership and know-how for establishing commercial-oriented nanotechnology programs. CNBA has recently launched NIL Fab, which provides prototyping services and low volume production of leading edge devices with nanoscale dimensions on low cost polymer. Other initiatives include CANEUS, and an international clean water initiative that makes use of nanotechnology and other advanced technologies.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 12:43 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    August 01, 2005

    Professor Robert Geer, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor of Nanoscience, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University of Albany, State University of New York, 7/13/05


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    One of the largest global centers for nanotechnology, Albany NanoTech is home to the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and the New York State Center of Excellence in Nanoelectronics (NYSCEN) of the University at Albany–State University of New York. Its 450,000 square foot complex, including the only 200mm/300mm wafer facilities in the academic world, encompasses nanoelectronics, system-on-a-chip technologies, biochips, optoelectronics and photonics devices, closed-loop sensors for monitoring, detection and protection, and ultra-high-speed communication components.

    A major focus for Professor Geer's research group is in the area of nanometrology—developing novel processes to quantitatively measure fundamental properties of nanoscale structures and devices. For example, ultrasonic force microscopy and heterodyne force microscopy have been used to carry out near-field nanomechanical imaging for carbon nanotubes, nanobelts, and nanowires and map nanoscale variations in mechanical modulus in a variety of nanoelectronic test structures.

    A second area of interest concerns investigations of self-assembling, DNA-based molecular wires and devices for next generation integrated circuits. This research focuses on manipulating the self-assembly of beta-sheet proteins to form nanoscale conductive structures suitable for molecular electronic applications. Dip-pen nanolithography is currently being applied to these materials to controllably deposit test structures suitable for electrical and structural characterization for prototypical molecular-electronic device architectures.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 04:35 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    July 25, 2005

    Dr. Myriam Sarachik, 2005 L'Oreal/UNESCO for Women in Science Laureate, June 22, 2005

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    For more than 40 years, Dr. Myriam Sarachik has been a prominent experimental condensed matter physicist and a leader in the international physics community. She is the recipient of the 2005 Oliver E. Buckley Prize in Condensed Matter Physics.Dr. Sarachik's career in experimental condensed matter physics has focused on superconductivity, disordered metallic alloys, metal-insulator transitions in doped semiconductors, hopping transport in solids, and tunneling of magnetization in molecular magnets. In particular, she has made seminal contributions to Kondo physics, a central theme in condensed matter physics, and the metal-insulator transition.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 12:45 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    July 19, 2005

    Dr. Jim Hutchison, Director, Materials Science Institute, University of Oregon, June 8, 2005

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    Dr. Jim Hutchison and his research group (a diverse group of synthetic chemists, analytical chemists, and applied physicists) design and make new functional materials. His specific research interests include preparation and study of nanoscale materials, surfaces, and polymers, for applications such as nanoelectronics, biocompatibility, and environmental remediation. He played key roles in developing the UO's nation-leading program in "green" (environmentally benign) organic chemistry, and designing the Materials Science Institute Graduate Internship Program in Semiconductor Processing.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 08:45 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index | TrackBack

    Dr. Douglas Ray, Chief Research Officer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, June 15, 2005

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    Dr. Doug Ray discusses catalysis science and how it impacts our daily lives. Dr. Ray describes designing controlled catalytic reactions, based on nanoscience and high-performance computing. Biological catalysts could be used in environmental remediation, and photocatalysis could be used to produce "benign" fuels, such as hydrogen-based fuels. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory that advances the fundamental understanding of complex systems and provides science-based solutions for the nation.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 08:43 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

    Dr. Susanne Arney, Director of Nanotechnology Research, Lucent Technologies' Bell Labs, June 1, 2005

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    For 20 years Dr. Susanne Arney has been involved in seminal nanotechnology and MEMS component design, fabrication, and reliability physics assessments. Since 1992, she has conducted pioneering research into Optical MEMS applications in telecommunications, as well as novel physics experiements enabled by MEMS. In 1997, she founded Lucent's MEMS Reliability Physics Research Group, spearheading a "design for reliability" program to enable commercialization of Optical MEMS for lightwave network applications.

    Posted by David Lemberg at 08:40 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index