May 11, 2006

Dr. Arnie Miller, Paleontologist, and Professor and Head of the Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, and Adjunct Curator, Cincinnati Museum of Natural History, 5/10/06


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Dr. Arnie Miller is a paleontologist at the University of Cincinnati, where he has been a faculty member since completing his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1986. Currently, Dr. Miller is Professor and Head of the Department of Geology, a Fellow of the Graduate School, and an Adjunct Curator at the Cincinnati Museum of Natural History. He is a former editor of Paleobiology, which is widely regarded as the preeminent peer-reviewed journal in the field of paleontology, and he is currently an associate editor of the Journal of Geology, Palaios, and Palaeoworld.

Dr. Miller’s current research focuses on the history of biodiversity throughout geological time at regional and global scales. In particular, he is has sought to calibrate and understand the biological effects of major global episodes of species diversification (radiations) and decline (mass extinctions). Partly as an outgrowth of these efforts, he became a charter member in 1998 of the Paleobiology Database project, a web-hosted effort to capture data from the fossil record of life in cyberspace. The project has expanded to include over 200 scientists from around the world, and Dr. Miller currently serves on the Steering Committee that oversees the collaboration. Dr. Miller’s research has been published in Science, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Paleobiology, Geology, Journal of Geology, Palaios, and several other journals, and his work has been funded by NASA, NSF, NOAA, and the American Chemical Society (Petroleum Research Fund).

Dr. Miller is co-author, with Michael Foote (University of Chicago), of the forthcoming book, Principles of Paleontology, 3rd ed. (W.H. Freeman and Company; Summer 2006). He is also organizing the North American Paleontological Convention, a quadrennial event that will take place at the University of Cincinnati in 2009, coinciding with the bicentennial of the birth of Charles Darwin and the sesquicentennial of the publication of The Origin of Species.

Posted by David Lemberg at 10:41 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

May 03, 2006

Carl Zimmer, Science Writer, 4/12/06


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The New York Times Book Review calls Carl Zimmer "as fine a science essayist as we have". He is the author of four books about science.

In our 4-12-06 podcast, Mr. Zimmer discusses the evolution of our vertebrate ancestors and what fossils have shown us about the origin of vertebrates. Mr. Zimmer also discusses where our vertebrate brains came from and how vertebrate fins turned into legs.

Soul Made Flesh, published in 2004, chronicled the dawn of neurology in the 1600s. The Sunday Telegraph called it a "tour-de-force", and it was named one of the 100 notable books of 2004 by The New York Times Book Review. His latest book is Smithsonian Intimate Guide to Human Origins, published in November 2005 by Smithsonian Books.

Mr. Zimmer writes regularly about science for The New York Times, as well as for magazines including National Geographic, Science, Newsweek, and Discover, where he is a contributing editor. His book reviews appear in The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post Book World, Newsday, and Scientific American.

He is author of the award-winning web log, The Loom.

Mr. Zimmer's honors include the American Association for the Advancement of Science's 2004 Science Journalism Award. His work has appeared in The Best American Science and Nature Writing series. In 2002 Mr. Zimmer was named a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow.

Posted by David Lemberg at 11:01 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

January 07, 2006

Carl Zimmer, Science Writer, 1/4/06


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The New York Times Book Review calls Carl Zimmer "as fine a science essayist as we have". He is the author of four books about science.

Soul Made Flesh, published in 2004, chronicled the dawn of neurology in the 1600s. The Sunday Telegraph called it a "tour-de-force", and it was named one of the 100 notable books of 2004 by The New York Times Book Review. His latest book is Smithsonian Intimate Guide to Human Origins, published in November 2005 by Smithsonian Books.

Mr. Zimmer writes regularly about science for The New York Times, as well as for magazines including National Geographic, Science, Newsweek, and Discover, where he is a contributing editor. His book reviews appear in The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post Book World, Newsday, and Scientific American.

He is author of the award-winning web log, The Loom.

Mr. Zimmer's honors include the American Association for the Advancement of Science's 2004 Science Journalism Award. His work has appeared in The Best American Science and Nature Writing series. In 2002 Mr. Zimmer was named a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow.

Posted by David Lemberg at 03:04 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index