October 06, 2005

Professor Yaneer Bar-Yam is the founding President of the New England Complex Systems Institute, 9/21/05


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Professor Yaneer Bar-Yam is the founding President of the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI), an independent nonprofit educational and research institution dedicated to advancing the study of complex systems. NECSI was established as a collaboration of faculty from Harvard, MIT, Boston University, Brandeis, and other academic institutions. In his research, Professor Bar-Yam has contributed to both physics and complex systems. On the technical side, he developed multiscale analysis, representations, and modeling, and contributed to the fundamental concepts of evolution and understanding the structure and dynamics of networks. He has also used complex systems concepts to advance a variety of diverse fields including the understanding of genetic regulatory networks, conservation biology, and systems engineering.

Professor Bar-Yam has lectured at and advised numerous corporations and government agencies, Raytheon, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, the World Bank, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Military, the Department of Defense, and the intelligence community. His most recent research has applied complex systems ideas to complex problems facing companies and societal networks. He has developed the understanding of how the structure, processes, and information flow of organizations can be designed to meet challenges at all scales.

Professor Bar-Yam is the author of two books and over 150 articles in professional journals. His newest book, Making Things Work, explains how the basic concepts of complexity theory can solve complex problems in healthcare, education, international development, ethnic violence, and terrorism.

NECSI is an independent educational and research institution dedicated to advancing the study of complex systems. Complex systems have multiple interacting components whose collective behavior cannot be simply inferred from the behavior of components. The recognition that understanding the parts cannot explain collective behavior has led to various new concepts and methodologies that are affecting all fields of science and engineering, and are being applied to technology, business, and even social policy.

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