June 30, 2006

Dr. Annalisa Crannell, Associate Professor of Mathematics at Franklin & Marshall College, 6/28/06


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Dr. Annalisa Crannell is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at Franklin & Marshall College. Her primary research lies in an area called Topological Dynamical Systems, which is closely related to Chaos Theory. Dr. Crannell has also worked in education and outreach, co-editing a book for young mathematicians called Starting our Careers (American Mathematical Society) and co-authoring a book of writing projects for math classes called Crushed Clowns, Cars, and Coffee to Go (Mathematical Association of America).

Currently Dr. Crannell is working with Marc Frantz of Indiana University on a book on Mathematics and Art. Viewpoints: Mathematical Perspective and Fractal Geometry in Art is funded by the National Science Foundation and will be published by Princeton University Press. In addition, Dr. Crannell runs VIEWPOINTS, a summer workshop for mathematicians and artists, and she gives talks around the country on this project.

Posted by David Lemberg at 11:19 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

June 29, 2006

Dr. Elaine Chew, Assistant Professor, Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, 6/28/06


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Dr. Elaine Chew is an Assistant Professor in the Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, where she is also a key investigator at the Integrated Media Systems Center. She received a B.A.S. in mathematical and computational sciences, and music at Stanford University, and S.M. and Ph.D. degrees in Operations Research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Between Cambridge and Los Angeles, she spent a year at Lehigh University as a Visiting Assistant Professor.

Dr. Chew’s thesis, completed under the supervision of Jeanne Bamberger, with OR co-advisor Georgia Perakis, proposed a mathematical model for tonality, the system of relations that serves as a framework for our hearing of tonal music, and computational methods for abstracting tonal structures. Her Spiral Array model and associated algorithms introduced an “interior point” approach to the problem of key finding in computational music cognition. A year after graduation, she was recruited by the University of Southern California’s Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering to forge a link between the department and the Integrated Media Systems Center.

At USC, Dr. Chew’s foray into mathematical modeling of music flourished and expanded to include collaborative projects in music information retrieval, distributed immersive performance, and musical expression synthesis. She also developed a course on computational methods for music perception and cognition.

Apart from creating computer models to analyze and manipulate music, Dr. Chew also performs frequently as an articulate proponent of post-tonal music. Her performances can be heard on NPR and WGBH’s Art of the States program.

In 2004, Dr. Chew was honored with an NSF Career award for her proposal on performer-centered approaches to computer-assisted music making, in which she stated that her purpose was “to establish engineering music research as a core academic discipline” and to “promote the use of computational research in music processing by humans as a basis for creating and improving human-computer interaction in computer music systems”.

Posted by David Lemberg at 10:34 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

June 08, 2006

Dr. Barbara Tobias and Dr. Nancy Elder, University of Cincinnati, and Amber Lucero-Criswell, Cincinnati Art Museum — The Art of Observation, 6/7/06


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Barbara Bowman Tobias, M.D., is an Associate Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, where she is a family physician, clinician, and award-winning teacher at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Dr. Tobias teaches in all four years of medical education and directed the medical interview course for over 10 years. Teaching interests in addition to Family Medicine include ethics, death and dying, physical diagnosis, human sexuality and domestic violence. Her work in medical education has been presented regionally and nationally at the Society of Teachers in Family Medicine and American Association of Medical Colleges.

Dr. Tobias is the recipient of the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine award, sponsored by the Arthur Gold Foundation, and the Silver Apple Award, given by graduating medical students to the faculty member that most positively impacted their medical education. Dr. Tobias is the creator and director of an innovative elective course entitled the Art of Observation, which uses a partnership with the Cincinnati Art Museum to teach observation, description, and interpretation skills to medical students.

Nancy C. Elder, MD, MSPH is an Associate Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, where she is a primary care researcher, clinician, and teacher. Dr. Elder has been at UC since 2001, where she has focused her research on patient safety and medical errors in the outpatient primary care setting. She has received both federal and foundation funding for her work, which focuses on two related areas: the experience of patients with medical errors and improving the systems of care in physicians’ offices to improve patient safety.

Dr. Elder has presented at many national meetings, and has published her work in respected medical journals, including JAMA, the Annals of Family Medicine, and the Journal of Patient Safety. She maintains a clinical practice, providing care to the homeless population of Cincinnati through the Healthcare for Homeless Program. She teaches medical students about patient safety, and co-directs an innovative elective course entitled The Art of Observation, which uses a partnership with the Cincinnati Art Museum to teach observation, description, and interpretation skills to medical students.

Amber Lucero-Criswell is the Associate Curator of Education for Interpretation and Adult Programs at the Cincinnati Art Museum. With a background in the fine arts and art history, Amber curates the educational programs for adult audiences and works to effectively interpret works of art for the public. Since 2001, Amber has collaborated with the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine to teach "The Art of Observation" and leads students in the Art Museum-based sessions, teaching the skills of observation, description, interpretation, and emotional response through the careful study of works of art.

Posted by David Lemberg at 12:04 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

May 18, 2006

Walter Murch, Academy Award-winning Film Editor and Sound Designer, Part 1, 5/17/06


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Walter Murch has been editing and mixing sound in San Francisco since starting on Francis Ford Coppola's film “The Rain People” (1969). He supervised the sound on George Lucas’s “THX-1138”, Coppola’s “The Godfather,” Lucas’s “American Graffiti” (1973), and Coppola’s “The Godfather Part II” (1974), won his first Academy Award nomination for “The Conversation” (1974) for which he was also picture editor, won his first Oscar for “Apocalypse Now” (1979), and won unprecedented double Oscars for sound mixing and picture editing for his work on “The English Patient” (1996).

Mr. Murch helped reconstruct “Touch of Evil” to Orson Welles’s original notes, and edited Anthony Minghella’s “The Talented Mr. Ripley”. Mr. Murch was, along with George Lucas and Francis Coppola, a founding member of northern California cinema. Mr. Murch has written and directed — Return to Oz (1985) — but as an editor and sound man he is one of the few universally acknowledged masters in his field. While working on “Apocalypse Now”, Mr. Murch coined the term Sound Designer, and along with colleagues at San Francisco’s Dolby Laboratories originated the current standard film-sound format, the 5.1 channel array, helping to elevate the art and impact of film sound to a new level.

Mr. Murch edited Anthony Minghella’s “Cold Mountain” on Apple's sub-$1000 Final Cut Pro software using off-the-shelf Power Mac G4 computers. This was a leap for such a big-budget film, where expensive Avid systems were the standard non-linear editing system. He received an Academy Award nomination for this work and his efforts on the film were documented in Charles Koppelman's 2004 book Behind the Seen.

Unlike most film editors today, Mr. Murch works standing up, comparing the process of film editing to “brain surgery and short-order cooking”, since both cooks and surgeons stand when they work. In 1976 he invented a film splicer which conceals the evidence of the splice by using extremely narrow but strongly adhesive strips of special polyester-silicone tape.

Mr. Murch is perhaps the only film editor in history to have received Academy nominations for films edited on four different systems:

“Julia” (1977) using upright Moviola
“Apocalypse Now” (1979), “Ghost” (1990), and “The Godfather”, Part III (1990) using KEM flatbed
“The English Patient” (1996) using Avid
“Cold Mountain” (2003) using Final Cut Pro

Mr. Murch has written one book on film editing, In the Blink of an Eye (2001) and was the subject of Michael Ondaatje's book The Conversations (2002).

Posted by David Lemberg at 11:30 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

Walter Murch, Academy Award-winning Film Editor and Sound Designer, Part 2, 5/17/06


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We continue the "Science and Society" conversation with Walter Murch.

Posted by David Lemberg at 11:23 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index