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June 30, 2006

Dr. Annalisa Crannell, Associate Professor of Mathematics at Franklin & Marshall College, 6/28/06


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Dr. Annalisa Crannell is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at Franklin & Marshall College. Her primary research lies in an area called Topological Dynamical Systems, which is closely related to Chaos Theory. Dr. Crannell has also worked in education and outreach, co-editing a book for young mathematicians called Starting our Careers (American Mathematical Society) and co-authoring a book of writing projects for math classes called Crushed Clowns, Cars, and Coffee to Go (Mathematical Association of America).

Currently Dr. Crannell is working with Marc Frantz of Indiana University on a book on Mathematics and Art. Viewpoints: Mathematical Perspective and Fractal Geometry in Art is funded by the National Science Foundation and will be published by Princeton University Press. In addition, Dr. Crannell runs VIEWPOINTS, a summer workshop for mathematicians and artists, and she gives talks around the country on this project.

Posted by David Lemberg at 11:19 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

June 29, 2006

Dr. Elaine Chew, Assistant Professor, Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, 6/28/06


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Dr. Elaine Chew is an Assistant Professor in the Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, where she is also a key investigator at the Integrated Media Systems Center. She received a B.A.S. in mathematical and computational sciences, and music at Stanford University, and S.M. and Ph.D. degrees in Operations Research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Between Cambridge and Los Angeles, she spent a year at Lehigh University as a Visiting Assistant Professor.

Dr. Chew’s thesis, completed under the supervision of Jeanne Bamberger, with OR co-advisor Georgia Perakis, proposed a mathematical model for tonality, the system of relations that serves as a framework for our hearing of tonal music, and computational methods for abstracting tonal structures. Her Spiral Array model and associated algorithms introduced an “interior point” approach to the problem of key finding in computational music cognition. A year after graduation, she was recruited by the University of Southern California’s Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering to forge a link between the department and the Integrated Media Systems Center.

At USC, Dr. Chew’s foray into mathematical modeling of music flourished and expanded to include collaborative projects in music information retrieval, distributed immersive performance, and musical expression synthesis. She also developed a course on computational methods for music perception and cognition.

Apart from creating computer models to analyze and manipulate music, Dr. Chew also performs frequently as an articulate proponent of post-tonal music. Her performances can be heard on NPR and WGBH’s Art of the States program.

In 2004, Dr. Chew was honored with an NSF Career award for her proposal on performer-centered approaches to computer-assisted music making, in which she stated that her purpose was “to establish engineering music research as a core academic discipline” and to “promote the use of computational research in music processing by humans as a basis for creating and improving human-computer interaction in computer music systems”.

Posted by David Lemberg at 10:34 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

June 22, 2006

Dr. Paul Anastas, Director, American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute, 6/21/06


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Dr. Paul Anastas is the Director of the Green Chemistry Institute at the American Chemical Society. Until July 2004, Dr. Anastas served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) as Assistant Director for Environment. Prior to joining the White House in October of 1999, Dr. Anastas served as the Chief of the Industrial Chemistry Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency since 1989.

Dr. Anastas, known as the "Father of Green Chemistry", was recognized in 2005 as one of the most influential people in science and technology in the “Scientific American 50”. He is the co-author/editor of nine scientific and technical books including Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice which outlined the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry and has been translated into five languages.

Dr. Anastas is the recipient of the Joseph Seifter Award, the U.S. EPA's highest scientific award for risk reduction and risk assessment, and the Nolan Summer Award, for contributions to chemistry. He currently is a Visiting Professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of Nottingham, U.K., and serves on the editorial board of the journals Environmental Science and Technology, Green Chemistry, and Clean Technology and Environmental Policy.

Posted by David Lemberg at 09:30 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

Dr. Richard Borgens, Director, Center for Paralysis Research. and Mari Hulman George Professor of Applied Neurology. Purdue University, 6/21/06


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Dr. Richard Borgens is the Mari Hulman George Professor of Applied Neurology in the School of Veterinary Medicine at Purdue University. He is the founder of Purdue's Center for Paralysis Research, which was established in 1987 both to develop and test promising methods of treatment for spinal cord injuries.

Most notably, Dr. Borgens developed the oscillating field stimulator, a small, battery-powered device that stimulates nerve regeneration. Early testing with spinal injured patients has produced increased sensory perception and potential use of their extremities.

Dr. Borgens is internationally known for his research on animal regeneration and spinal cord injuries. He holds several patents in the field, including one for a method of reducing chronic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord issues.

Prior to accepting a faculty position at Purdue, Dr. Borgens was a National Paraplegia Foundation Fellow. His early work with electrical fields drew national acclaim for his lab. Building and expanding on this work brought different approaches to treating paralysis, including PEG, or polyethylene glycol, which has the ability to break the chain reaction of spinal cord damage if it is applied quickly enough.

Posted by David Lemberg at 09:23 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

June 16, 2006

Dr. Michael Mackay, Professor of Chemical Engineering, and Adjunct Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 6/14/06


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Professor Michael E. Mackay is Professor of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, and Adjunct Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University. He received his undergraduate degree in chemical engineering with distinction from the University of Delaware in 1979. He received an M.S. in 1983 and a Ph.D. in 1985 at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Following his Ph.D. he joined the chemical engineering staff at the University of Melbourne (Australia) as a University of Melbourne Postdoctoral Fellow. He was a staff member in the Chemical Engineering Department at The University of Queensland (Australia) from 1987 until 1998. From 1999 through mid-2001 he was a professor at Stevens Institute of Technology.

Professor Mackay joined the faculty at Michigan State University in mid-2001 where he is performing research in the area of nanotechnology and its application to plastic materials. His most recent work has been published in Science and Nature Materials where very unusual phenomena have been discovered when nanoparticles are added to polymers or plastics.

Posted by David Lemberg at 09:40 AM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

June 15, 2006

Dr. Arthur Daemmrich, Director, Center for Contemporary History and Policy, Chemical Heritage Foundation, 6/14/06


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Dr. Arthur Daemmrich is the director of the Center for Contemporary History and Policy at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia. He earned a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from Cornell University and a B.A. in History and Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania. The projects he supervises at CHF bring long-range perspectives to bear on issues in innovation, globalization, risk, health, and environmental policy.

Dr. Daemmrich has held fellowships from the Social Science Research Council/Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies, the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and the Chemical Heritage Foundation. He has published on biotechnology policy and politics, the sociology of medicine, and pharmaceutical drug regulation, and is editor or author of three books.

The Center for Contemporary History and Policy at the Chemical Heritage Foundation carries out projects at the interface of contemporary chemical and molecular sciences and technologies, industry, and science policy. The center is built on the core principle that history and policy are domains that should inform one another. The center is structured around a group of programs that draw upon diverse historical and contemporary source materials to provide knowledge and advice to stakeholders from industry, academia, government, and citizen groups. The center’s programs record, characterize, and analyze the economic, health, and environmental changes associated with advances in science, technology, and medicine.

Posted by David Lemberg at 12:14 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

June 09, 2006

Dr. Kevin Knight, Senior Research Scientist and Fellow, Information Sciences Institute, Viterbi School of Engineering, University of Southern California, 5/24/06


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Dr. Kevin Knight is Senior Research Scientist and Fellow, Information Sciences Institute, USC Viterbi School of Engineering, and Research Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Southern California. Dr. Knight was a major force in reorienting the field of natural language processing toward the pervasive use of statistical learning over large corpora, and in the process revolutionized the practice of Machine Translation. He is now widely regarded as a world leader in statistical natural language processing, with significant contributions across a wide range of topics, including efficient decoding algorithms, incorporating syntactic knowledge into statistical translation models, natural language generation, machine transliteration, and knowledge representation.

Dr. Knight has also made a significant impact through co-authoring one of the definitive general textbooks on Artificial Intelligence (with Dr. Elaine Rich) and through his role in developing publicly available software for statistical machine translation (GIZA). A recent survey article in Scientific American identified Language Weaver, the startup company Dr. Knight launched wtih ISI colleague Dr. Daniel Marcu, as the standout in the field of machine translation, and identified Dr. Knight as “the pioneer in statistical translation”. He notes the state of the machine translation art still falls far short of a longtime goal first enunciated in 1957 by Noam Chomsky — the creation of an algorithm that would be able to judge whether a given string of words made up a grammatical English sentence.

Dr. Knight received his B.A. in computer science from Harvard University (1986) and his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University (1992). He has served on the Editorial Boards of Computational Linguistics and Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research.

Posted by David Lemberg at 03:48 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

June 08, 2006

Dr. Barbara Tobias and Dr. Nancy Elder, University of Cincinnati, and Amber Lucero-Criswell, Cincinnati Art Museum — The Art of Observation, 6/7/06


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Barbara Bowman Tobias, M.D., is an Associate Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, where she is a family physician, clinician, and award-winning teacher at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Dr. Tobias teaches in all four years of medical education and directed the medical interview course for over 10 years. Teaching interests in addition to Family Medicine include ethics, death and dying, physical diagnosis, human sexuality and domestic violence. Her work in medical education has been presented regionally and nationally at the Society of Teachers in Family Medicine and American Association of Medical Colleges.

Dr. Tobias is the recipient of the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine award, sponsored by the Arthur Gold Foundation, and the Silver Apple Award, given by graduating medical students to the faculty member that most positively impacted their medical education. Dr. Tobias is the creator and director of an innovative elective course entitled the Art of Observation, which uses a partnership with the Cincinnati Art Museum to teach observation, description, and interpretation skills to medical students.

Nancy C. Elder, MD, MSPH is an Associate Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, where she is a primary care researcher, clinician, and teacher. Dr. Elder has been at UC since 2001, where she has focused her research on patient safety and medical errors in the outpatient primary care setting. She has received both federal and foundation funding for her work, which focuses on two related areas: the experience of patients with medical errors and improving the systems of care in physicians’ offices to improve patient safety.

Dr. Elder has presented at many national meetings, and has published her work in respected medical journals, including JAMA, the Annals of Family Medicine, and the Journal of Patient Safety. She maintains a clinical practice, providing care to the homeless population of Cincinnati through the Healthcare for Homeless Program. She teaches medical students about patient safety, and co-directs an innovative elective course entitled The Art of Observation, which uses a partnership with the Cincinnati Art Museum to teach observation, description, and interpretation skills to medical students.

Amber Lucero-Criswell is the Associate Curator of Education for Interpretation and Adult Programs at the Cincinnati Art Museum. With a background in the fine arts and art history, Amber curates the educational programs for adult audiences and works to effectively interpret works of art for the public. Since 2001, Amber has collaborated with the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine to teach "The Art of Observation" and leads students in the Art Museum-based sessions, teaching the skills of observation, description, interpretation, and emotional response through the careful study of works of art.

Posted by David Lemberg at 12:04 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index

Dr. Vincent Pieribone, co-author, Aglow in the Dark -- The Revolutionary Science of Biofluorescence, 6/7/06


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Dr. Vincent Pieribone is co-author of Aglow in the Dark: he Revolutionary Science of Biofluorescence, recently published by Harvard University Press. Aglow in the Dark conveys the human fascination with bioluminescence, or “living light”, its little-known application in war, forensic science, and molecular biology, and how it led to the discovery of green fluorescent protein. Uses of bioluminescence include studying brain physiology, treatment of disease, and potential applications linking minds and machines.

Dr. Pieribone is Associate Fellow, The John B. Pierce Laboratory, and Associate Professor, Cellular & Molecular Physiology and Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine. He attended New York University College of Arts and Sciences where he received a B.A. in Biology and Chemistry in 1986. He then attended New York University's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and received his Ph.D. in 1992 in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. From 1990 to 1992 he was a National Science Foundation and Fogarty International Fellow at the Nobel Institute of Neurophysiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. Pieribone did postdoctoral work at The Rockefeller University in New York from 1992 to 1995 and became an Assistant Professor there in 1995. He joined the Pierce Laboratory in 1997.

is co-author of Aglow in the Dark: he Revolutionary Science of Biofluorescence, recently published by Harvard University Press. Aglow in the Dark conveys the human fascination with bioluminescence, or “living light”, its little-known application in war, forensic science, and molecular biology, and how it led to the discovery of green fluorescent protein. Uses of bioluminescence include studying brain physiology, treatment of disease, and potential applications linking minds and machines.

Posted by David Lemberg at 12:00 PM Return to Science and Society Podcasts Main Index