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June 08, 2006

Dr. Vincent Pieribone, co-author, Aglow in the Dark -- The Revolutionary Science of Biofluorescence, 6/7/06


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Dr. Vincent Pieribone is co-author of Aglow in the Dark: he Revolutionary Science of Biofluorescence, recently published by Harvard University Press. Aglow in the Dark conveys the human fascination with bioluminescence, or “living light”, its little-known application in war, forensic science, and molecular biology, and how it led to the discovery of green fluorescent protein. Uses of bioluminescence include studying brain physiology, treatment of disease, and potential applications linking minds and machines.

Dr. Pieribone is Associate Fellow, The John B. Pierce Laboratory, and Associate Professor, Cellular & Molecular Physiology and Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine. He attended New York University College of Arts and Sciences where he received a B.A. in Biology and Chemistry in 1986. He then attended New York University's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and received his Ph.D. in 1992 in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. From 1990 to 1992 he was a National Science Foundation and Fogarty International Fellow at the Nobel Institute of Neurophysiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. Pieribone did postdoctoral work at The Rockefeller University in New York from 1992 to 1995 and became an Assistant Professor there in 1995. He joined the Pierce Laboratory in 1997.

is co-author of Aglow in the Dark: he Revolutionary Science of Biofluorescence, recently published by Harvard University Press. Aglow in the Dark conveys the human fascination with bioluminescence, or “living light”, its little-known application in war, forensic science, and molecular biology, and how it led to the discovery of green fluorescent protein. Uses of bioluminescence include studying brain physiology, treatment of disease, and potential applications linking minds and machines.

Posted by David Lemberg at June 8, 2006 12:00 PM Return to SCIENCE AND SOCIETY home page